Strategic Planning at Valencia

Strategic Planning and College Planning Council Archive Webpage

Welcome to the Strategic Planning Archives area.

These webpages contain information on taskforces, workgroups, and initiatives dating back to 2006. Note that all information contained within these pages is for information only. Should you need additional assistance or further information, please contact Noelia Maldonado or Dr. Susan Ledlow.

This webpage contains archive information only.

  • Big Meeting
  • Task Forces
  • Work Products
  • Strategic Planning
  • College Planning Council
  • Enrollment Planning

The College Planning Council convened a representative group of around 170 faculty, professional staff, and career service staff on Friday, March 2, 2007, to identify strategic issues and develop goals for the College for 2008-13.

At Valencia, we have come to call this type of meeting a "Big Meeting," since it involves a large, representative group in considering significant recommendations to the President and the District Board of Trustees. The recommended goals will steer the future of the College, and annual budgets will reflect those goals. Dr. Shugart joined us, as did Mr. Slocum, who is chair of our District Board of Trustees and a member of the College Planning Committee.

Those invited to this Big Meeting included: 1) members of the four College governing councils, 2) the College Planning Committee, 3) the planning task forces, and 4) additional staff and faculty who expressed strong interest and/or whose role at the College lends itself to assisting with this stage of the planning effort.

This Big Meeting was very important to the creation of the Strategic Plan, and we appreciate the commitment of time, thought and energy of those involved.

In advance of the meeting, the participants were asked to read and think about the documents linked below, which include:

  1. Proposed revisions to our statements of Mission, Vision and Values developed by a task force of your colleagues.
  2. The information in a "Situational/Needs Analysis", also developed by a task force of your colleagues who studied data about the College and the community. The Analysis looks at recent and projected trends and poses important questions about the College's future.
  3. Key data points from which the Situational/Needs Analysis is based.
  4. The goals in the 2001-07 Strategic Learning Plan, and the most recent refresh of that plan.
  5. Information helping to define what we mean by strategies, strategic issues, and strategic goals.

Questions about the meeting may be directed to Susan Kelley (skelley@valenciacollege.edu).

Big Meeting Documents

 

The College Planning Council, working in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Assessment, planned a Big Meeting for March 19, 2010. The Big Meeting is an important component both of the College’s Institutional Effectiveness effort and of the annual evaluation of progress toward the goals and objectives in our Strategic Plan.

At the 2010 Big Meeting, college leaders from the faculty, professional staff, career service staff, and administration were invited by the President to consider the baseline data gathered for use in evaluating the Strategic Plan for 2008-13, and review the plans developed by the various divisions and departments of the college that are aimed at achieving the strategic goals and objectives.

The Big Meeting provided the opportunity to identify and make recommendations to the President about any missing pieces of the work to be done to achieve the strategic goals and objectives, to make recommendations regarding how the work might best be sequenced and coordinated, and to recommend any changes the group may deem advisable to the 2008-13 strategic goals and objectives and/or the evaluation plan.

The College Planning Council provided a report to the President and the District Board of Trustees after the Big Meeting, updating the Trustees on progress made during the 2009-10 year.

Four strategic goal teams prepared recommendations for consideration at the Big Meeting during November 2009 - March 2010. The charge to the Goal Teams is reproduced below.

 

Big Meeting Work Products

 

Big Meeting Agenda for March 19, 2010

 

President Shugart's Goal Essays

 

Goal Team Reports on Issues and Initiatives

 

Goal Team Recommendations on Outcomes and Measures

 

Supplementary Report Materials

 

Big Meeting is an important component both of the College’s Institutional Effectiveness effort and of the annual evaluation of progress toward the goals and objectives in our Strategic Plan. The meeting provides the opportunity to identify and make recommendations to the President about any missing pieces of the work to be done to achieve the strategic goals and objectives, to make recommendations regarding how the work might best be sequenced and coordinated, and to recommend any changes the group may deem advisable to the 2008-13 strategic goals and objectives and/or the evaluation plan.

The College Planning Council, working in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Assessment, have planned a Big Meeting for June 2, 2011.

If you you have any questions regarding Big Meeting, please contact the College Planning Council co-chairs, Joan Tiller or Jean Marie Führman

.

 

Big Meeting Agenda & Materials

 

Goal Team Reports and Materials

 

Goal 1

2010-11 Team 1 Report

2010-11 Team 1 Initiatives Report

2009-10 Team 1 Report

Goal One Essay: Build Pathways

2010-11 Team 1 Supplementary Report

Team 1 Baseline Data Reports:

 


Goal 2

2010-11 Team 2 Report

2010-11 Team 2 Initiatives Report

2009-10 Team 2 Report

Goal Two Essay: Learning Assured

2010-11 Team 2 Supplementary Report

Team 2 Baseline Data Reports:


Goal 3

2010-11 Team 3 Report

2010-11 Team 3 Initiatives Report

2009-10 Team 3 Report

Goal Three Essay: Invest in Each Other

2010-11 Team 3 Supplementary Report

Team 3 Baseline Data Reports:

 

TOP


Goal 4

2010-11 Team 4 Report

2010-11 Team 4 Initiatives Report

2009-10 Team 4 Report

Goal Four Essay: Partner with the Community

2010-11 Team 4 Supplementary Report

Team 4 Baseline Data Reports:

Data Team Reports on External and Internal Changes

Data Task Force Team Combined Internal Reports 2011

Data files reviewed in 2011:

 

2008-13 Strategic Plan

Strategic Goal Teams

In 2009-10, the College Planning Council convened a Strategic Goal Teams for each of the four goals in the College Strategic Plan: 1) Build Pathways, 2) Learning Assured, 3) Invest in Each Other, and 4) Partner with the Community. Each goal team will monitor progress toward a goal, collect and interpret data, monitor related strategic issues, make recommendations to the annual Big Meeting, and prepare an annual report on progress toward the goal.

CPC convened the 2010-11 Strategic Goal Teams on October 22, 2010. If you are interested in participating in a goal team and have not already volunteered, please email Joan Tiller or Jean Marie Führman.

You can access the complete Charge to the 2010-11 Goal Teams here.

 

Big Meeting is an important component both of the College’s Institutional Effectiveness effort and of the annual evaluation of progress toward the goals and objectives in our Strategic Plan. The meeting provides the opportunity to identify and make recommendations to the President about any missing pieces of the work to be done to achieve the strategic goals and objectives, to make recommendations regarding how the work might best be sequenced and coordinated, and to recommend any changes the group may deem advisable to the 2008-13 strategic goals and objectives and/or the evaluation plan.

The College Planning Council, working in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Assessment, planned a Big Meeting for June 12, 2012.

If you you have any questions regarding Big Meeting 2012, please contact the College Planning Council co-chairs, Joan Tiller or Jean Marie Führman

.

 

Big Meeting Agenda & Materials

 

 

Charge to the Data and Situational/Needs Analysis Task Force:

The Data and Situational/Needs Analysis Task Force of the College Planning Council was charged with carrying out the following activities and completing the work products named during the August – November 2006 period:

  • Studying a list of planning questions developed by the College Planning Council, and the Senior Executive Staff, and determining relevant qualitative and quantitative data that can be identified or generated that will assist the College in addressing these questions (August – mid-September)
  • Securing the data identified and sharing it among the Task Force members for discussion, with the aim of developing a narrative description that analyzes the College’s and the community’s situation, focusing on needs, defined as gaps in results(mid-September – mid-October)
  • Reporting on progress at the September 28 meeting of the College Planning Council, working through the Council member who serves as a liaison from the Task Force to the Council (2:30, East 3-113)
  • Collaborating to write the narrative situational/needs analysis and to present the analysis and relevant data on which it is based to the entire College at Learning Day, October 31, 2006. (Last two weeks of October)
  • Sharing a draft with the College Planning Council on October 26, working through the liaison (2:30 p.m., Winter Park Campus).
  • Assisting in evaluation of the work of the Task Force and documenting the work as part of the planning process archives. (November 2006)

View the Situational Task Force's meeting agendas and minutes.

 

Charge to the Strategic Planning Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force:

The Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force of the College Planning Council was charged with carrying out the following activities and completing the work products named during the August 2006 – February 2007 period:

  • designing and conducting a process for the college as a whole to consider the statements of vision, values, and mission at Learning Day, October 31, 2006, in light of the situational/needs analysis presented to the College by the Data and Situational/Needs Analysis Task Force (August – October 2006)
  • receiving and considering the comments from the College and the community and drafting recommended updates to the Vision, Values, and Mission statements, and sharing those proposed revisions collegewide, seeking a high level of agreement on the statements to be recommended to the president and the trustees (October 2006 – February 2007)
  • reporting on the activities of the Task Force at the regular meetings of the College Planning Council, working through the liaison from the Council who will serve on the Task Force.

View the Mission Task Force's meeting agendas and minutes.

 

Charge to the Strategies, Goals and Objectives Task Force

The Strategies, Goals and Objectives Task Force reviewed the processes used to create the strategies and goals in the current SLP, and proposed a process to invite broad input into decisions to be made about strategies, goals and objectives for 2008-13.

The work took place during 2007-2008. Resulting recommendations for new strategies, goals, and objectives were made to the Planning Committee, and the 2008-09 budget (and the budgets in subsequent years) reflects the priorities in the plan.

The Charge to the Strategies, Goals, and Objectives Task Force

The Strategies, Goals, and Objectives Task Force of the College Planning Council was charged with carrying out the following activities and completing the work products named during February 2007 - April 2008:

  • Reviewing the process used to develop the strategies and goals in the current Strategic Learning Plan as background information to recommend a collaborative process to develop those components of the 2008-13 plan.
  • Attending the Big Meeting on March 2, and based on a review of the discussion at that meeting and the planning documents that support the discussion, developing a draft list of strategic issues and related strategic goals for 2008-13.
  • Sharing the draft list of strategic issues and goals with the college as a whole, and with the College Planning Council, the President’s Staff, and the College Planning Committee, for comment prior to finalizing the first draft in March/ April 2007.
  • Being available to provide assistance to the governing councils, if requested by the councils, during May – October, as the Councils recommend further refinements to the goals and strategies and develop measurable objectives to implement the goals.
  • In Fall 2007, developing a chart that depicts the goals and objectives in terms of the results levels that each addresses on the Organizational Elements Model, demonstrating the integration of the goals and objectives in terms of the results each is aimed at achieving.
  • Receiving recommended goal and objective statements from the governing councils in October, and suggesting edits to address overlaps or incongruencies among the goals so that they may be combined into a clear and cohesive Strategic Plan.

Resources

Student Leader Draft Goals Ranking August 2007
Student Leader Goal Ideas August 2007
Student Leader Response to Draft Goals August 2007

 

Charge to the Strategic Planning Communications Task Force:

The Communications Task Force of the College Planning Council is charged with carrying out the following activities and completing the work products named:

  • preparing and executing an internal communications plan for the strategic planning process that ensures that all Valencia employees are aware of the planning process and timeline, its products, and their opportunities to be involved(Preparation of the plan - August -September 2006)
  • in consultation with College and Community Relations, the Provosts, the President, and the Valencia Foundation, preparing a plan for communicating with key stakeholders in the community regarding community needs and their opportunities to be involved in the strategic planning process (Preparation of the plan - August -October 2006)
  • executing the internal communications plan, routinely providing information to the college through identified means, including a planning web site, notices in the Bulletin, presentations at appropriate council meetings and campus-based meetings, and emails (August 2006 -November 2007)
  • working with College and Community Relations to execute the communications plan with community stakeholders (August 2006-November 2007)
  • collaborating with the Evaluation Task Force on periodic evaluation of communications throughout the process and in a summative evaluation at the conclusion
  • reporting on communications at the regular meetings of the College Planning Council working through the liaison from the Council who will serve on the Task Force
  • working with College and Community Relations to design and communicate plans for a collegewide celebration of the plan as it is launched in 2008-09. (April 2008 - April 2009)

View the Communication Task Force's meeting agendas and minutes.

 

Charge to the Strategic Planning Evaluation Task Force:

The Evaluation Task Force of the College Planning Council was charged with carrying out the following activities and completing the work products named during the August 2006 – February 2008 period:

  • preparing and executing a plan for formative and summative evaluation of the strategic planning process in terms of the extent to which the process was carried out in keeping with its design principles, and based on the evaluation, making recommendations for mid-course changes to improve the process and its products and recommendations for changes to take place in the planning cycle for 2015-2020 (Preparation of the plan – August – October 2006)
  • preparing and executing a plan for evaluation of each of the work products of the planning process, working in collaboration with the CPC, the Task Forces carrying out the phases of the process, and the College Planning Committee (Preparation of the plan - August – October 2006)
  • preparing a recommended evaluation design and timetable for the goals and objectives contained in the final strategic plan for 2008-15 (September 2007 – February 2008)
  • reporting on evaluation plans, activities, and results at the regular meetings of the College Planning Council, working through the liaison from the Council who will serve on the Task Force.

View the Evaluation Task Force's meeting agendas and minutes.

 

Meeting Agendas and Minutes

 

College Planning Council

 

Budget & Financial Advisory Group

Meeting Agendas

 

Minutes

 

College Planning Committee

 

Data and Situational / Needs Analysis Task Force

 

Mission, Vision, Values Task Force

 

Communications Task Force

 

Evaluations Task Force

 

Key Points That Will Shape Valencia's Future

This webpage contains archive information only.

A Fall 2006 review of data by the Data and Situational/Needs Analysis Task Force revealed seven key points that the task force believes are critically important to the College as we plan our future.

1. Demand for higher education will grow in Central Florida due to continuing population increases, changes in the employment market, and workforce vacancies as baby boomers retire. While high school graduates will increase, the proportion earning a standard diploma will decline. University admissions limits will increase the number of students starting at community colleges.

2. The students in our future will be increasingly diverse in background and needs. Younger students will prefer non-traditional methods of learning. Prospective students over age 44 (a group that will increase at a higher rate than will the younger population) will be interested in career changes and growth, weighing the investment of their time in education as a cost.

3. Educational options available to students will continue to evolve. Private institutions will increase in number and enrollments, and financial aid policies and availability will make it possible for students to attend higher cost private institutions if they choose.

4. Working to improve learning results, and to document those improvements, will continue to challenge the College and our students. The College can expect increased community interest in how it can partner to increase high school graduation rates and improve college readiness. As students move on to their first experiences at Valencia, a large number will struggle, and we will need more information about why this is the case. As learning technologies evolve, the College will need more information about which students can be successful with different learning modalities, such as web-based courses. 

5. The community's needs and related expectations are changing. More employees will be required who readily learn and adapt to new technologies, who work effectively and serve people from other cultures, and who contribute to solving societal and global problems. Employment in the biological sciences, health care, high-technology fields, business, construction, hospitality, and teaching will experience highest local demand. Cries for public accountability will intensify, adding to the need to collect, analyze and report to the public, and to improve our assessment of learning.

6. Valencia's costs of doing business will continue to rise, and so must our revenues. Our needs will exceed available State funds, meaning that we must continue to seek alternative revenue through gifts, grants, and revenue-generating activities. Significant investments in land, new facilities, renovations, and technologies will be required in a marketplace in which scarcity of many resources will drive up costs. Competition for qualified personnel and the need for the development of new leaders will intensify as baby boomers retire.

7. Defining community (which is, in fact, our middle name) is increasingly complicated and increasingly important. Just as the members of our immediate families are less likely to all live in one geographic location, it is increasingly difficult to pinpoint geographically the "community" that we serve or could serve, both due to technology opening up distance learning options, and due to growing numbers of people world-wide looking to Orlando as a place to come for higher education. Valencia will be expected to contribute to solving problems, both natural and human-made, that have no geographic boundaries, such as worldwide health crises, disaster recovery, or the prevention of violence. What we do here and now as we plan for 2008-13 will make a difference to our community, no matter how broadly or narrowly we define it.

 

The Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force, based on collegewide input at Learning Day on October 31, 2006, has developed the following first draft of revised statements of Vision, Values, and Mission for collegewide consideration. Your comments are welcome. Please contact Task Force convener David Rogers (drogers@valenciacollege.edu) to share your thoughts. We appreciate your taking time to consider these and share your ideas.

Vision

“Valencia Community College: an extraordinary learning community”

Statutory Purpose

Valencia is a publicly supported, comprehensive community college that continually identifies and addresses the changing learning needs of the communities it serves. The College provides::

  • Associate-degree programs that prepare learners to succeed in university studies.
  • Courses and services that provide learners with the right start in their college careers.
  • Associate degree, certificate, and continuing professional education programs that prepare learners for entering and progressing in the workforce

Mission

Valencia Community College supports the success of each learner by embracing our values and committing to partnerships with public, civic, and workforce organizations throughout our communities.  Our mission is to provide opportunities for academic, technical, and life-long learning in a collaborative culture dedicated to inquiry, results, and excellence.

Values

We value:

  • Learning by committing to Valencia’s core competencies – Think, Value, Communicate, and Act – and the potential of each person to learn at the highest levels of achievement for personal and professional success.
  • People by creating a caring, inclusive, and safe environment that inspires all people to achieve their goals, share their successes, and encourage others.
  • Diversity by fostering the understanding it builds in learning relationships and appreciating the dimensions it adds to our quality of life.
  • Access by reaching out to our communities, inviting and supporting all learners and partners to achieve their goals.
  • Integrity by respecting the ideals of freedom, civic responsibility, academic honesty, personal ethics, and the courage to act.

How did the initial, discussion draft version of the Vision, Values, and Mission statements come about?

Responses from full-time college employees were collected during the morning Visioning Session on Learning Day, October 31, 2006.  Two activities during that session produced over 1200 comments on Valencia’s existing Vision, Values, and Mission statements.

An initial sort of those responses was conducted by the Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force Core Editing Team.  The team sorted responses based on the existing Vision, Values, and Mission statements to identify duplications and additions.

In November, the Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force identified six emergent themes in the sorted data and recommended the Core Editing Team perform another sorting around those themes.  The Task Force reduced those six themes to five at their December meeting.  There was consensus that these five, with brief explanatory statements, addressed both the comments received on Learning Day and the spirit of the existing Vision, Values, and Mission statements.  The revisions presented the concepts in a simpler and more direct format.  The Task Force authorized the Core Editing Team to proceed with a draft of the explanatory statements.

Preliminary drafts of the edited Values, Vision, and Mission statements were shared with the Vision, Values, and Mission Task Force for review and comments in mid-December and on January 16, 2007.  This initial discussion draft was the product of that review.


Why do we need Vision, Values, and Mission statements?

One of the primary ways that our accrediting body, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, evaluates the integrity of “educational quality” is by examining how well the college’s defined learning mission and core values impact student learning.  When serious discussions of mission, goals, teaching, student aspirations, learning outcomes, and support services are regular and productive, college processes are more coherent, more meaningful, and more useful to students, employees, and the local community.

The Vision, Values, and Mission statements should guide discussions and actions toward improving learning, realizing aspirations, and identifying challenges and solutions.  They should drive strategic thinking at Valencia.


Comments are welcome

In the coming weeks, opportunities for discussion on these draft revisions will be available on all campuses.  For more information, for comments, or for scheduling a discussion time for your department or group, please contact David Rogers, Special Assistant, Learning-Centered Initiative.

Please click on link below to download:

 

Draft Strategic Issues

Strategic issues are those issues that must be resolved if the College is to achieve its mission. The strategic goals are aimed at helping to resolve the strategic issues and to move the College toward its vision and the achievement of the Big Hairy Audacious Goals. Strategic issues that Valencia faces in 2007 are:

  1. Many students from diverse backgrounds do not have equal access to college.
  2. Many students whose stated goal is to obtain a certificate or a degree are not successful in reaching critical milestones in their educational plans.
  3. Gaps in student achievement exist among student cohorts related to ethnicity and income.
  4. The composition of the group that graduates each year does not match the diversity of entering cohorts.
  5. Diversity is not fully utilized as a strength throughout the curriculum and the College.
  6. While the College does not control all factors that lead to student success, many students fail to complete their courses with a grade of C or better for reasons potentially under the control of the College.
  7. Not all students receive academic support tailored to their needs as they move through the curriculum.
  8. The college lacks the human, fiscal, technological, and physical resources to meet all of the current needs of students and all who want to be students.
  9. Students, faculty and staff do not always have access to up-to-date, effective technologies that support learning and professional success.
  10. Many of the issues that stand in the way of our students’ success require resources and expertise from other organizations with complementary missions, if the issues are to be resolved.
  11. Valencia can expect delays and challenges in hiring due to the highly competitive market for key positions.
  12. Current faculty and staff have unrealized potential that should be developed to further the College’s goals.
  13. College staffing levels, systems and processes can sometimes lead students to feel as if they are “numbers” rather than persons to be served.
  14. The College’s operating, technology and capital budgets do not always align clearly with the strategic plan.

August 2, 2007 Draft

Draft Strategic Goals for 2008-2013

  1. Build Pathways:
    • Remove barriers to college.
    • Create connections that raise personal aspirations of students and enable them to achieve their aspirations.
    • Develop and renew programs.
  2. Learning Assured:
    • Create optimal conditions for student learning.
    • Partner with students to improve their contribution to achieving their potential.
    • Close achievement gaps.
  3. Invest in Each Other:
    • Strengthen our collaborative institutional culture to foster deep stewardship of our work.
    • Support the professional development, career growth and healthy lives of Valencia’s employees.
  4. Partner with the Community:
    • Cooperate with community partners in meeting students’ needs and College goals.
    • Involve the college in meeting the community’s needs and goals.

Next Steps

This document will be shared College-wide and with the College Planning Committee. The Committee will take action in August 2007, and once approved by the Committee, it will be presented to the District Board of Trustees for its consideration.

Goal teams for each of the four strategic goals will draft measurable objectives that name the results that we want to change during 2008-13 if we are to achieve each goal.

Members of the goals teams will collaborate on essays that clarify the meaning of each goal.

The objectives and the essays will be shared College-wide for comment in late October or early November 2007, and edited based on feedback received. The final version will be incorporated into the 2008-13 strategic plan in November 2007. The strategic plan will be presented to the College Planning Committee in November 2007, and with the approval of the Committee, to the District Board of Trustees in December 2007.

 

July 2008

Valencia’s Strategic Plan for 2008-13 was approved by the District Board of Trustees on June 17, 2008, following a two-year planning period that involved constituencies from throughout the college and from the community that we serve.

As we begin the 2008-09 academic year, the College is completing the task of gathering the baseline data named in the Evaluation section of the Strategic Plan. Planning units throughout the College are creating plans for their work and linking those plans to the goals and objectives in the new Strategic Plan. (Each subdivision of the College that is assigned a separate budget is considered to be a planning unit.)

The Communications Task Force, led by Karen Blondeau, will be sharing information about the new plan with the college and community in a variety of ways. If you have ideas, or are interested in working with the Task Force, contact Karen.

Also in Fall 2008, a series of essays will be released which explore and invite Collegewide conversations about the meaning of the four strategic goals. These essays are being co-authored by President Sandy Shugart and members of the Goals Teams who worked in 2007-08 to develop the objectives for each goal.

On March 20, 2009, a Big Meeting will be held to explore progress made in 2008-09.

Detailed Updates

 

The College Planning Council welcomes you to the Budget and Financial Advisory Group page.

If you have questions about our work, are interested in getting involved, or have comments to offer, please contact either of our co-chairs, Keith Houck or Rob McCaffrey.

Charge of the Budget & Financial Advisory Group

  • Design and implement a college-wide process for gathering input and feedback that will be used in the development of budget goals, principles and priorities and the development of the annual budget.
  • Review processes that guide decisions having budgetary implications at the request of the College Planning Council.
  • Research, at the request of the College Planning Council, issues that impact the annual college budget.
  • Review annually and revise as needed the Strategic Budget Initiative Process.
  • Review annually and revise as needed the Research and Development for Innovations Processes.
  • Hold an annual orientation session for members of the Strategic Budget Initiatives Review Group prior to SBI proposal submission review and ranking process.

Budget & Financial Advisory Group 2013

Name

Representative Group

Mail Code

Ext.

Kristen Abel

Faculty

3-2

2403

Sherri Dixon

Budget Office

DTC-3

3306

Sue Fagan

Budget Office

DTC-3

3309

Elisha Gonzalez-Bonnewitz

Professional

DTC-2

3120

Jeff Hogan

Professional

4-14

5564

Keith Houck

Co-Chair

DTC-3

3465

Susan Ledlow

Administrator

DTC-4

3415

Bonnie Oliver

Faculty

3-29

2214

David Sutton

Administrator

3-2

2753

2 Career Staff positions are currently vacant

 

 

 

BUDGET STATEMENT FOR 2012-13

The Budget Statement for 2012-2013 was prepared under the direction of Jean Marie Führman, co-chair of the Budget and Financial Advisory Group, to determine whether the College’s budget for 2012-13 reflected the Budget Planning Principles adopted by the College Planning Council. The Budget Statement was approved by the College Planning Council as being representative of the college’s budget allocation process. Please click on the following link to view the Budget Statement: 2012 - 2013 Budget Statement

BUDGET PLANNING PRINCIPLES FOR 2013-14

This year the Budget and Financial Advisory Group has moved from value-centered principles to design-centered principles. By using design-centered principles, we hope to align our resources with Valencia's vision, values, mission, and strategic and organizational plans. Since the budget principles are a living document, both the process and content will continue to be a part of Valencia's ongoing institutional effectiveness cycle.

  • Enchance the quality of studnet experience while minimizing the financial impact
  • Strtive to retain and develop quality employees
  • Strive for a robust quality of service and support
  • Continue to trust those closest to the work to apply principles of effective stewardship in the use of college resources
  • Create a multi-year financial strategy that strikes a balance between making the best use of our resources and managing our fund balance*
  • Make the budget process collaborative and transparent at all levels of the college
  • Invest in strategic initiatives that are focused on improving student success
  • Maintain resources to maximize sustainability
  • Seek out and invest in innovative thinking

*The fund balance is an accumulation of excess revenues over expenditures that is available for use by the college.  We are required by Florida Statute 1011.84(3) to maintain a minimum unallocated fund balance of at least 5% of total operating funds available.

Revised 10/25/12 by the Budget & Financial Advisory Group

 

The College Planning Committee is a representative group that makes recommendations about the content of the strategic plan to the President. The President, in turn, makes final recommendations to the District Board of Trustees. The Committee includes a 10-member Steering Committee, described below, and 20 additional members: 9 senior staff not serving as council co-chairs, 2 deans; 3 additional faculty, 3 additional professional staff, and 3 additional career service staff.

The Committee reviews and approves the planning process and its work products, notes any additional information or consultation needed as the plan is developed, and makes needed adjustments to ensure a clear, consistent, and logical strategic planning document.

The Planning Steering Committee is a sub-group of the College Planning Committee composed of the President , six governing council co-chairs, one Trustee, one representative of Career Service staff, and one representative of the professional staff.

The College Planning Committee membership during 2006-08 included: Joe Battista, Amy Bosely, Tom Byrnes, Julie Corderman, Suzette Dohany, Kurt Ewen, Fitzroy Farquharson, Geraldine Gallagher, Jared Graber, Thomas Greene, Keith Houck, Debi Jakubcin, Brenda Jones, Susan Kelley, Sue Maffei, Michele McArdle, Kenneth Moses, Bill Mullowney, John Niss, Ruth Prather, Joyce Romano, Sanford Shugart, Michael Shugg, Larry Slocum, Stan Stone, Linda Swaine, Chanda Torres, Kaye Walter, Rose Watson, Bill White, Falecia Williams, Reneesa Williams, Silvia Zapico, and Marisa Zuniga.

For more information, visit the Learning-Centered Initiative site.

View the Committee's meeting agendas and minutes.

 

Approved by College Planning Council - May 25, 2006
Submitted to the President for Approval - June 5, 2006

The dates in this Plan were adjusted by the College Planning Council during 2006-08 and the final version is in the Strategic Plan for 2008-15Appendix D.

Plan for Planning Committee Members: Linda Anthon, Fiona Baxter, Fitzroy Farquharson, Jean Marie Fuhrman, Linda Swaine, David Rogers

1. Design principles for the Strategic Planning Process

(These are numbered for ease of reference, but are not listed in any priority order.)

  1. The planning process and the plan that it yields will be learning-centered, will be grounded in the College's history of excellence, innovation, and community, and will support the quality and aspiration that bequeath the College with its distinctive place in higher education.
  2. The process will be strategic by impacting the results the college aims to provide to society and to students as they progress in their programs of learning.
  3. The planning process will be collaborative by operating within our shared governance structure that ensures broad-based participation and by providing a means for stakeholder groups to be heard and to influence the plan.
  4. The process will build trust through effective communication and negotiation, by making it safe to identify and challenge assumptions, and by supporting agreements on shared values and the making of mutual commitments that are the basis for the strategic plan, and that are honored as the plan is implemented.
  5. The process will be meaningful in that it will help the College to establish a vision of the future that shapes, defines, and gives meaning to its strategic purpose, and in that it will help to shape strategic decisions, some of which are identified in advance.
  6. The process will be data-driven, using qualitative and quantitative data, routinely reviewed as the plan is implemented, with the aim of continuous improvement.
  7. The plan will include formative and summative evaluation components that evaluate the planning process itself, as well as the implementation of the plan, using agreed upon performance indicators.
  8. The process will have a clear cycle of activities, with a beginning and an end, and timed and structured to coordinate well with SACS accreditation requirements.
  9. The process will be as simple as possible while yielding a viable plan, avoiding the trap of imposing more order than the College can tolerate, and integrating planning into permanent governing structures and collegewide meetings, rather than creating a separate set of activities removed from the governance and life of the College.
  10. The process will support the integration of fiscal, learning, and facilities plans with the strategic plan of the college, through careful timing and by clearly connecting each of these plans to the College's revised Vision, Mission, and Values.
  11. The strategic plan will be useful to and therefore used by councils, campuses and departments as they prepare their plans, and will encourage a future orientation to their work.
  12. The process, its language, its products, and the results of the plan will be communicated to all employees internally.
  13. The plan will be expressed clearly, with language that is understood by stakeholders and with clear means of measuring progress.
  14. The process will be truly comprehensive, and will have clearly assigned roles for individuals and groups, including students.

2. Name the work products of the planning process

  • needs assessment/situational analysis/environmental scan, providing a common understanding of the present and the anticipated future, including information about our competitors and clearly defined gaps in results at the mega, macro, and micro levels, as defined by Roger Kaufman's planning model
  • reviewed/revised mission (the role we will play), vision, and values statements
  • a set of college strategies (the ways in which we will play our role and get results), goals (what results we want to accomplish within our role), measurable outcomes objectives (how much will we change specific results at the mega, macro, and micro levels as used in Kaufman's model), and related activities to achieve the objectives within an agreed upon timeframe
  • an evaluation plan, including indicators/measures of institutional effectiveness, revised as needed, and a means of assessing the extent to which College decisions are consistent with the plan
  • a recommended assignment of responsibilities for objectives to the governing councils
  • list of major decisions to be impacted by the plan, which could include decisions such as:
    • academic program plans for new campus(es) and evolution of programs on existing campuses
    • the goals in the College enrollment plan
    • Future Valencia Foundation fund raising goals
    • Focus of the Quality Enhancement Plan for SACS in 2010-2012
    • Professional development multi-year plan
    • Multi-year financial plan and annual budgets
    • Major external funding requests with collegewide impact, such as Title III and Title V
    • Community relations priorities and programs
    • Efforts designed to support student learning and to maintain academic excellence
    • Strategic facilities plans
    • Final proposed planning document for submission to the president and trustees

3. Establish first planning cycles and project future cycles.

  • The following sample cycle provides for three, six-year planning cycles, with a mid-point review/update/adjustment at the end of the third year of each cycle. Importantly, this is planned to complement the SACS accreditation process in 2010-12 and 2020-22, and to enable the institution to devote adequate time and energy to both strategic planning and to developing the Quality Enhancement Plan required by SACS.
  • 2006-07 - Complete remaining priority items under current Strategic Learning Plan.

2008-2015 Planning Cycle

    Needs Assessment/Situational Analysis/environmental scan/- completed by November 30, 2006
  • Review/revise mission, vision, and values statements - completed by February 28, 2007
  • Proposed strategies, goals and measurable objectives - completed by April 30, 2007
  • (The strategies and goals will be set by working through a joint meeting of the governing councils, with a means for collegewide input and feedback. The objectives for each goal will be proposed by each Council to which goals are assigned.)
  • Proposed activities to achieve the objectives - completed by August 31, 2007
  • Complete strategic planning document finalized - completed by October 31, 2007
  • New plan for 2008-2015 presented to the Trustees for action - Nov - Dec 2007
  • Evaluation of the planning process - April 30, 2007
  • Annual evaluation of progress on plan - submitted in Spring of each year, covering the past calendar year, and impacting the budget process for the following year.

SACS 2010-12

  • SACS Quality Enhancement Plan - Must develop in 2010-11, should be selected based on the work on which we want to focus at this stage of the 2008-2015 plan.
  • Mid-point evaluation and update of 2008-15 plan - submitted Spring 2011
  • SACS Team Site Visit to Valencia - Spring 2012

2014-2019 Planning Cycle

  • Needs Assessment/Situational Analysis/Environmental Scan for 2014 - 2019- completed by November 30, 2012
  • Review/revision of mission, vision, and values statements - completed by February 28, 2013
  • Proposed strategies, goals and measurable objectives - completed by April 30, 2013
  • Proposed activities to achieve the objectives - completed by August 31, 2013
  • Complete strategic planning document finalized - completed by October 31, 2013
  • New plan for 2014-2019 presented to the Trustees for action - Nov-Dec 2013
  • Annual evaluation of progress on 2014-19 plan - submitted in Spring of each year, and impacting the budget process for the following year.
  • Mid-point evaluation and update of plan - submitted Spring 2017

2020-2025 Planning cycle

  • Needs Assessment/Situational Analysis/Environmental Scan for 2020-2025 - completed by November 30, 2018
  • Review/revision of mission, vision, and values statements - completed by February 28, 2019
  • Proposed strategies, goals and measurable objectives - completed by April 30, 2019
  • Proposed activities to achieve the objectives - completed by August 31, 2019
  • Complete strategic planning document finalized - completed by October 31, 2019
  • New plan for 2020-25 presented to the Trustees for action - Nov - Dec 2017

SACS - 2020-22

  • SACS Quality Enhancement Plan - Must develop in 2020-21
  • Annual evaluation of progress on plan - submitted in Spring of each year and impacting the budget process for the following year.
  • SACS Team Site Visit to Valencia - 2022
  • Mid-point evaluation and update of strategic plan - submitted Spring 2023

4. Set up an organizational chart of committees and/or task forces to design and carry out each phase, including projected Small Meetings and Big Meetings, and working closely with existing Councils and within the governance structure.

We will begin with the structure for 2006-07.

The CPC will work collaboratively with others to develop and recommend planning processes.

A Planning Committee, membership to be determined, will act on the recommendations that come from those processes, making final recommendations to the President and Trustees about content/priorities in the strategic plan.

The President, as our chief planner, is being consulted about the structure and membership of the Planning Committee.

We propose to recruit/name the following five task forces. We will seek to involve CPC alumni in these teams and in the planning work.

Task Force #1 - Need Assessment/Situational analysis/Environmental Scan

  • Data gathering will take place June - mid-September 2006.
  • Data analysis will take place during late September - early November 2006.

We would ask Thomas Greene, Rhonda Glover, Joan Tiller and Fiona Baxter to propose the data to be gathered (for CPC approval) and to suggest the optimum size for the task force.

We would then ask the Faculty Council and the professional and career service staff councils for volunteers, issue a collegewide call for volunteers, and invite CPC alumni to participate. The task force would coordinate the data gathering activities, analyze and summarize the findings (including a needs analysis that specifies results gaps), and conduct and issue an analysis of our situation (which may include a report on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats), completing their work by November 30, 2006.

We would ask the team to propose by the July 2006 CPC meeting a process of inviting large scale consideration of the data, resulting in a situational analysis report, which may include a SWOT analysis or some alternative assessment, to the College. This process would be acted on at the July CPC meeting, and recommended to the Planning Committee.

Task Force #2 - Mission, Vision, and Values

In Fall 2006, the CPC will recruit/name a Mission, Vision and Values Task Force. The task force will review the processes used to create the current statements, and  propose a process to invite broad input into review and revision, as needed, of these statements.

It is anticipated that the process will work within our current structures and collegewide meeting opportunities. For example, work to review and recommend changes to the Visions, Values, and Mission statements could be conducted as part of the October 31, 2006 Learning Day.

The task force will work with the CPC to carry out the process by February 28, 2007, with recommendations made to the Planning Committee at that time.

Task Force #3 - Strategies, Goals and Objectives

In January 2007, the CPC will recruit/name a Strategies, Goals and Objectives Task Force. The task force will review the processes used to create the strategies and goals in the current SLP, and propose a process to invite broad input into decisions to be made about strategies, goals and objectives for 2008-15.

It is anticipated that the process will work within our current structures and collegewide meeting opportunities. For example, the governing councils could be asked to work jointly, seeking input and reaction from the College, in crafting new strategies and goals. And each Council assigned new goals would be asked to develop measurable objectives and a plan of action to achieve the objectives, all of which would tie into the annual budgeting process and the multi-year financial plan.

The work would take place during the Summer and Fall of 2007. Resulting recommendations for new strategies, goals, and objectives would be made to the Planning Committee by October 31, 2007, and the 2008-09 budget (and the budgets in subsequent years) would reflect the priorities in the plan.

Task Force #4 - Communications

In July 2006, the CPC will recruit/name a Communications Task Force that will  have the responsibility of communicating with the College about the planning process, opportunities to participate, and the products of the process. This task force will play a pivotal role in ensuring that the plan is based on the best thinking of the College and that the planning process is open and builds trust.

Task Force #5 - Evaluation

In September 2006, the CPC will recruit/name an Evaluation Task Force that will have the responsibility of evaluating the planning process, using the design principles established, and seeking feedback from all those involved. The Task Force will also make recommendations about the process of evaluation of the results achieved throughout the implementation of the plan, working through existing councils and meetings to the greatest extent possible.

 

In 2009-10, the College Planning Council convened a Strategic Goal Teams for each of the four goals in the College Strategic Plan: 1) Build Pathways, 2) Learning Assured, 3) Invest in Each Other, and 4) Partner with the Community. Each goal team will monitor progress toward a goal, collect and interpret data, monitor related strategic issues, make recommendations to the annual Big Meeting, and prepare an annual report on progress toward the goal.

The first meeting of the four strategic goals teams was held November 10, 2009, on West Campus, in Building 8, the Special Events Center, from 1:15 - 4:15 p.m. If you have questions about our work, are interested in getting involved, or have comments to offer, please contact either of our co-chairs, Joan Tiller or Jean Marie Führman.

 

President Shugart's Goal Essays

 

Strategic Goal Team Materials

 

Goal Team Meeting Schedules

 

Goal Team Collective Work Products

 

Goal One Team Materials

1st Goal Team 1 Meeting Attachments- January 21, 2010

Minutes & Notes - January 21, 2010 Meeting

2nd Goal Team 1 Meeting Attachments - February 11, 2010

Minutes & Notes - February 11, 2010

3rd Goal Team 1 Meeting Attachments - March 1, 2010

 

Goal Two Team Materials

1st Goal Team 2 Meeting Attachments - December 11, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 11, 2009 Meeting

2nd Goal Team 2 Meeting Attachments - February 9, 2010

Minutes & Notes - February 9, 2010

3rd Goal Team 2 Meeting Attachments - February 23, 2010

 

Goal Three Team Materials

Subgroup 3.1

1st Subgroup Goal Team 3.1 Meeting Attachments - December 7, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 7, 2009 Meeting

2nd Subgroup Goal Team 3.1 Meeting Attachments - February 10, 2010

Minutes & Notes - February 10, 2010

 

Subgroup 3.2

1st Subgroup Goal Team 3.2 Meeting Attachments - December 16, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 16, 2009

2nd Subgroup Goal Team 3.2 Meeting Attachments - January 25, 2010

Minutes & Notes - January 25, 2010

 

Subgroup 3.3

1st Subgroup Goal Team 3.3 Meeting Attachments - December 2, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 2, 2009

2nd Subgroup Goal Team 3.3 Meeting Attachments - January 27, 2010

Minutes & Notes - January 27, 2010

 

Goal Four Team Materials

Subgroup 4.1 & 4.2

1st Subgroup Goal Team 4.1 & 4.2 Meeting Attachments - December 9, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 9, 2009

2nd Subgroup Goal Team 4.1 & 4.2 Meeting Attachments - January 28, 2010

Minutes & Notes - January 28, 2010

 

Subgroup 4.3 & 4.4

1st Subgroup Goal Team 4.3 & 4.4 Meeting Attachments - December 4, 2009

Minutes & Notes - December 4, 2009

2nd Subgroup Goal Team 4.3 & 4.4 Meeting Attachments - January 29, 2010

Minutes & Notes - January 29, 2010

  • Coming Soon

 

Charge of the 2009-10 Strategic Goal Teams

Each goal team will monitor progress toward a goal, collect and interpret data, monitor related strategic issues, make recommendations to the annual Big Meeting, and prepare an annual report on progress toward the goal.

Each goal team will maintain the College’s “to do” list of the initiatives and projects that are intentionally aligned with each goal. This list of a handful of major projects for each goal (not to be confused with the more exhaustive list that can be culled from all unit plans) will help us to maintain our focus on deliverables. This will also help us get past the vagueness that some may feel over what constitutes a “goal” vs. an “objective” vs. an “outcome.”

 

Composition of the Goal Teams

The goals teams, which will be recruited college-wide, will include volunteers from faculty, career service, professional and administrative staff. The Council will seek to have representation from each campus on each goal team. Also, care will be taken to ensure that those who have responsibility for the work of the goal are represented on each goal team.

 

Guiding Principles

The teams will utilize principles to guide their work, and will ask one member of the team to call the attention of the team to the extent to which the work is being conducted in keeping with  those principles. The teams will develop the principles at a first, joint meeting, set for November 10. That meeting will include Dr. Shugart who will assist in launching the work of the teams.

 

Responsibilities of the Goal Teams

The teams will have the following responsibilities, designed to be carried out in four or five meetings between November 2009 and June 1010, with support and assistance provided by the co-chairs of the College Planning Council. The first meeting was a joint meeting of all four goal teams, set for 1:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., November 10, 2009.

By December 18, 2009 (this should be achieved in one meeting, on November 10):

  • Review and discuss the goal assigned to the team and its place within the strategic plan.
  • Recommend ways to encourage college-wide discussion and dialog on the goal essay developed by the President that will provide perspective on the goal, with the aims of furthering understanding of the meaning of the goal and supporting its continued evolution based on what we learn from our assessment of progress each year.
  • Identify a few key strategic issues that relate to each goal, including relevant issues named in the Strategic Plan, and devise a means of monitoring those issues and updating the college regarding potential impact on the College and our ability to carry out the goal.
  • Develop principles to guide the work of the goal teams.

By February 5, 2010 (this work is anticipated to require two meetings):

  • Consider and recommend the changes that might be observed and documented that would indicate that the College was making progress toward achieving the goal.
  • Identify, obtain, and study appropriate baseline data that will be useful as indicators of progress toward achieving the goal, using 2008-09 as the baseline year. (Data may be obtained from the office of Institutional Research, the Data Task Force of the College Planning Council, the College Data Team, and/or other sources.)

By March 3, 2010 (this work is anticipated to require one meeting):

  • Review the original objectives developed for each goal, interpret baseline data and any progress data from 2009-10, review updates on strategic issues, draft a list of major projects and initiatives that are intentionally aligned with the goal, and make any recommendations regarding the goal that the committee believes may be advisable for consideration at the Big Meeting on March 19, 2010. (Team members will participate in the Big Meeting.)

By June 30, 2010 (this work is anticipated to require one meeting):

  • Prepare an annual report on progress toward the goal, with a focus on the list of major projects and initiatives that are intentionally aligned with the goal, including recommendations on how the College might use what is learned to improve its effectiveness.

 

In 2009-10, the College Planning Council convened a Strategic Goal Teams for each of the four goals in the College Strategic Plan: 1) Build Pathways, 2) Learning Assured, 3) Invest in Each Other, and 4) Partner with the Community. Each goal team will monitor progress toward a goal, collect and interpret data, monitor related strategic issues, make recommendations to the annual Big Meeting, and prepare an annual report on progress toward the goal.

 

Summaries of Progress on Goals 2009-10

College Planning Council 2009-10 Co-chairs Amy Bosley and Susan Kelley drafted a two-page summary of the findings of each 09-10 goal teams, presented in these four documents. The first page of each summary lists the goal and its objectives, and states the long-term aims set by the team. The second page provides a summary of progress in 2009-10.

Strategic Goal Team One: Build Pathways

Strategic Goal Team Two: Learning Assured

Strategic Goal Team Three: Invest in Each Other

Strategic Goal Team Four: Partner with the Community

 

 

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Combined Strategic Goal Team Meeting October 22, 2010

College Planning Council 2010-11 Co-chairs Ed Frame and Susan Kelley convened the 2010-11 Strategic Goal Teams in a combined meeting on October 22, 2010. Documents distrubuted to the new goal team members are listed below.

 

Team Rosters

 

Agenda & Documents

 

Team Meetings & Instructions

Strategic Goal Team One: Build Pathways

Baseline Data:

 

1st Goal Team 1 Meeting

Date: December 1, 2010 – 1:30PM to 3:30PM

Location: CJI 143

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 1 Meeting

Date: February 7, 2011 - 9:00AM to 12:00PM

Location: CJI 148

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 1 Meeting

Date: April 11, 2011 - 2:00PM to 4:30PM

Location: CJI 148

Agenda & Documents

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Strategic Goal Team Two: Learning Assured

Baseline Data:

 

1st Goal Team 2 Meeting

Date: November 19, 2010 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Location: CJI 150

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 2 Meeting

Date: February 3, 2011 - 1:30PM to 4:30PM

Location: EC 3-113

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 2 Meeting

Date: April 15, 2011 - 2:00PM to 4:00PM

Location: CJI 140

Agenda & Documents

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Strategic Goal Team Three: Invest in Each Other

Baseline Data:

 

Subgroup 3.1

1st Goal Team 3.1 Meeting

Date: November 10, 2010 - 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Location: EC 3-113 & GoToMeeting

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 3.1 Meeting (Subcommittee)

Date: March 21, 2011 - 2:00PM to 4:00PM

Location: WC SSB-171J

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 3.1 Meeting

Date: April 14, 2011 - 3:00PM to 4:30PM

Location: GoToMeeting

Agenda & Documents

 

Subgroup 3.2

1st Goal Team 3.2 Meeting

Date: November 15, 2010 - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Location: CJI 219

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 3.2 Meeting

Date: January 24, 2011 - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Location: CJI 219

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 3.2 Meeting

Date: March 22, 2011 - 2:00PM to 5:00PM

Location: CJI 219

Agenda & Documents

 

Subgroup 3.3

1st Goal Team 3.3 Meeting

Date: December 1, 2010 - 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Location: CJI 143

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 3.3 Meeting

Date: January 28, 2011 - 10:00AM to 12:00PM

Location: CJI 143

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 3.3 Meeting

Date: April 4, 2011 - 2:30PM to 4:30PM

Location: CJI 148

Agenda & Documents

 

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Strategic Goal Team Four: Parther with the Community

Baseline Data:

 

1st Goal Team 4 Meeting

Date: December 3, 2010 - 1:00PM to 4:00PM

Room: CJI 143

Agenda & Documents

 

2nd Goal Team 4 Meeting

Date: January 26, 2011 - 9:00AM to 12:00PM

Location: CJI 148

Agenda & Documents

 

3rd Goal Team 4 Meeting

Date: March 1, 2011 - 9:00AM to 12:00PM

Location: CJI 109

Agenda & Documents

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Goal Teams Roles and Responsibilities

 

Role

Responsibility

Convener

Schedules Goal Team Meetings with members (help with room reservations is available through CPC staff); prepares agenda

Recorder

Records minutes of meetings and distributes to group and CPC staff

Reporter

Reports group progress, findings, etc. to CPC as needed

Seekers

Actively seeks information to answer group questions or needs (could be two or three people in this role)

Questioners

Encourages group to explore multiple scenarios and ideas when addressing data sets and assumptions(could be two or three people in this role)

Principles Monitor

Monitors the group’s adherence to design principles and helps the group through tough conversations by focusing on principles

 

The College Planning Council (CPC) is one of Valencia’s four governing councils. Among the Council’s responsibilities are designing and conducting 1) a collaborative strategic planning process, and 2) a collaborative budgeting process that links the annual budget to the strategic plan.  The Strategic Plan for 2008-13 was approved by the District Board of Trustees on June 17, 2008. On September 9, 2011, the Board approved extending the Strategic Plan until 2015. You can access the summary Strategic Plan brochure here.

The Council works closely with and consults the Senior Leadership Team as it designs and conducts these processes. The CPC created Task Forces to carry out the phases of the planning process, and the charges, agendas, and minutes of those task forces may be accessed through the strategic planning web page. Volunteers were recruited collegewide for the various task forces. The task forces include: Vision, Values, and Mission; Data and Situational/Needs Analysis; Communications; Evaluation; and Strategies, Goals, and Objectives.

CPC is committed to a collaborative process with many opportunities for involvement of those within the college and in the community that we serve. Throughout the planning cycle, we will schedule big and small group meetings, community meetings, consultations with key constituencies, and discussions by the governing councils and the senior leadership team, all of which combine to enable broad based participation in the various phases of creating, updating, and evaluating the Strategic Plan.

During the 2012-13 period, the Council is scheduled to meet on September 27, October 25, November 29, January 24, February 28, March 28, and April 25.

To request additional information or for questions about the College Planning Council, please contact its co-chairs: Kurt Ewen, Jean Marie Führman, or Susan Ledlow.

2012-13 Council Membership

 

Member

Title

Represented

Group

Contact

Information

End of

Term

Susan Ledlow

(Chair)

VP Academic Affairs & Planning
VP Academic Affairs & Planning
Downtown Center, DTC-4, x3423
N/A

Kurt Ewen

(Co-Chair)

AVP Assessment and Institutional Effectiveness

Institutional Research

West Campus, 4-12, x1611

N/A

Jean Marie Führman

(Co-Chair)

Professor, Reading

Faculty

Winter Park Campus, 5-3, x6865

04/2013

Vivian Calderon

Administrative Assistant

Career Staff

Osceola Campus, 6-3, x4862

04/2014

Donna Deitrick

Staff Assistant I

Career Staff

West Campus, 4-1, x5473

04/2013

Regina Falconer

Professor, Biology

Faculty

East Campus

East Campus, 3-23, x2025

04/2013

Damion Hammock

Professor, Mathematics

Faculty

Winter Park Campus, 5-3, x6917

04/2014

Deidre Holmes DuBois

Professor, Speech

Faculty Council,

Vice President

Osceola Campus, 6-3, x4891

04/2014

Keith Houck

VP Operations & Finance

Chief Financial Officer

Downtown Center, DTC-3, x3300

N/A

Dale Husbands

Dean, Business Information Technology

Academic Deans

Osceola Campus, 6-8, x4841

04/2013

Stacey Johnson

Campus President

East & Winter Park Campus President

East, 3-1, x2822/Winter Park, 5-1, x6805

N/A

Amy Kleeman

AVP College Transition

Student Affairs Representative

West Campus, 4-25, x1238

04/2014

Kevin Matis

Network Server Specialist

Professional Staff

West Campus, 4-12, x1775

04/2014

Rob McCaffrey

Professor, Graphics Technology

Faculty Council,

President

East Campus, 3-2, x2784

04/2013

John McFarland

Professor, ESL

Faculty

Osceola Campus

Osceola Campus, 6-2, x4125

04/2013

Kathleen Plinske

Campus President

Osceola & Lake Nona

Campus President

Osceola Campus, 6-2, x4100

N/A

Jerry Reed

Programmer Analyst

Professional Staff

West Campus, 4-12, x5583

04/2013

Joyce Romano

VP Student Affairs

VP Student Affairs

Downtown Center, DTC-4, x3402

N/A

Deborah Simko

Professor, Nursing

Faculty

West Campus

West Campus, 4-14, x1739

04/2014

David Sutton

Dean, Humanities & Foreign Language

Academic Deans

East Campus, 3-2, x2753

04/2014

Bill White

Chief Information Officer

Chief Information Officer

West Campus, 4-12, x1185

N/A

Falecia Williams

Campus President

West Campus

Campus President

West Campus, 4-1, x1235

N/A

 

 

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College Planning Council Staff

 

Member

Title

Represented

Group

Contact

Information

End of

Term

Alys Arceneaux

Research Analyst

Institutional Research

West Campus, 4-12, x1611

N/A

Sherri Dixon

AVP Budget & Auxiliary Services

Financial Services

Downtown Center, DTC-3, x3306

N/A

Sonya Joseph

AVP Student Affairs

Student Affairs

Osceola Campus, 6-8, x4997

N/A

Jackie Lasch

AVP Financial Services

Financial Services

Downtown Center, DTC-3, x3302

N/A

Helene Loiselle

AVP Facilities & Sustainability

Facilities

West Campus, 4-21, x1707

N/A

Noelia Maldonado

Executive Assistant

Strategic Planning

Downtown Center, DTC-4, x3487

N/A

 

College Planning Council Charge

  • Coordinate the development and revision of the Strategic Learning Plan
  • Coordinate the development of the annual budget
  • Recommend multi-year budget and staffing plans
  • Oversee the measurement of institutional effectiveness
  • Function as Steering Committee for institutional accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
  • Oversee the College's Diversity Plan

 

 

Design Principles for the Strategic Planning Process


The College Planning Council established the following principles to guide the strategic planning work:
(These are numbered for ease of reference, but are not listed in any priority order.)

  1. The planning process and the plan that it yields will be learning-centered, will be grounded in the College’s history of excellence, innovation, and community, and will support the quality and aspiration that bequeath the College with its distinctive place in higher education.
  2. The process will be strategic by impacting the results the college aims to provide to society and to students as they progress in their programs of learning.
  3. The planning process will be collaborative by operating within our shared governance structure that ensures broad-based participation and by providing a means for stakeholder groups to be heard and to influence the plan.
  4. The process will build trust through effective communication and negotiation, by making it safe to identify and challenge assumptions, and by supporting agreements on shared values and the making of mutual commitments that are the basis for the strategic plan, and that are honored as the plan is implemented.
  5. The process will be meaningful in that it will help the College to establish a vision of the future that shapes, defines, and gives meaning to its strategic purpose, and in that it will help to shape strategic decisions, some of which are identified in advance.
  6. The process will be data-driven, using qualitative and quantitative data, routinely reviewed as the plan is implemented, with the aim of continuous improvement.
  7. The plan will include formative and summative evaluation components that evaluate the planning process itself, as well as the implementation of the plan, using agreed upon performance indicators.
  8. The process will have a clear cycle of activities, with a beginning and an end, and timed and structured to coordinate well with SACS accreditation requirements.
  9. The process will be as simple as possible while yielding a viable plan, avoiding the trap of imposing more order than the College can tolerate, and integrating planning into permanent governing structures and collegewide meetings, rather than creating a separate set of activities removed from the governance and life of the College.
  10. The process will support the integration of fiscal, learning, and facilities plans with the strategic plan of the college, through careful timing and by clearly connecting each of these plans to the College’s revised Vision, Mission, and Values.
  11. The strategic plan will be useful to and therefore used by councils, campuses and departments as they prepare their plans, and will encourage a future orientation to their work.
  12. The process, its language, its products, and the results of the plan will be communicated to all employees internally.
  13. The plan will be expressed clearly, with language that is understood by stakeholders and with clear means of measuring progress.
  14. The process will be truly comprehensive, and will have clearly assigned roles for individuals and groups, including students.

Work Products of the Planning Process

The College Planning Council has named the following as the products of the planning process:

  • needs assessment/situational analysis/environmental scan, providing a common understanding of the present and the anticipated future, including information about our competitors and clearly defined gaps in results at the mega, macro, and micro levels, as defined by Roger Kaufman’s planning model
  • reviewed/revised mission (the role we will play), vision, and values statements
  • a set of college strategies (the ways in which we will play our role and get results), goals (what results we want to accomplish within our role), measurable outcomes objectives (how much will we change specific results at the mega, macro, and micro levels as used in Kaufman’s model), and related activities to achieve the objectives within an agreed upon timeframe
  • an evaluation plan, including indicators/measures of institutional effectiveness, revised as needed, and a means of assessing the extent to which College decisions are consistent with the plan
  • a recommended assignment of responsibilities for objectives to the governing councils
  • list of major decisions to be impacted by the plan, which could include decisions such as:
    • academic program plans for new campus(es) and evolution of programs on existing campuses
    • the goals in the College enrollment plan
    • Future Valencia Foundation fund raising goals
    • Focus of the Quality Enhancement Plan for SACS in 2010-2012
    • Professional development multi-year plan
    • Multi-year financial plan and annual budgets
    • Major external funding requests with collegewide impact, such as Title III and Title V
    • Community relations priorities and programs
    • Efforts designed to support student learning and to maintain academic excellence
    • Strategic facilities plans
    • Final proposed planning document for submission to the president and trustee

For more information, visit the Learning-Centered Initiative site.

For more information about the College Budget, which is the fiscal expression of our plans, visit the Budget Process site.

View the Council's meeting agendas and minutes.

TOP

 

Organizational Overview

 

The College Planning Council will work closely with and consult the Senior Leadership Team as it designs and conducts the planning process. The CPC will charge Task Forces with designing and carrying out the phases of the process, ensuring that decisions are made in a collaborative fashion, using Big and Small Group meetings, consulting with key constituencies, and working through the governing councils and the Senior Leadership Team.

The Planning Steering Committee will be composed of the President (1), the council co-chairs (6), a Trustee (1), and a representative of Career Service and Professional staff (2). The Steering Committee will make final recommenda- tions regarding strategy and the content of the plan.

The full Committee will include 20 additional members: 9 senior staff not serving as co-chairs, 2 deans;, 3 additional faculty, 3 additional professional staff, and 3 additional career service staff. This group of 30 will review work products, note any additional information or consultation needed, and make needed adjustments to ensure a clear, consistent, and logical document.

 

Enrollment Planning

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.       Executive Summary

II.      Relationship to Strategic Planning Process

III.     Vital Issues

IV.    Response to Vital Issues

V.     Precision Schedule Development

VI.    Environmental Scan/Data

VII.   Data Analysis

VIII.  Goals

IX.    Key Performance Indicators

X.     Strategies

XI.     Accountability - Stewardship

XII.    Enrollment Management Learning Plan

XIII.   Enrollment Management Research Agenda

 

I.   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

At Valencia College we believe that enrollment growth can be strategically influenced by internal actions when these actions are tightly coupled to our strategic enrollment management plan. The strategic enrollment management plan allows us to intentionally use marketing, scheduling, staffing, budgeting, etc. in a strategic manner to enable us to meet our enrollment targets. 

The Strategic Enrollment Planning process enables Valencia faculty and staff to create action plans that turn our vision and concepts for the future into reality.  Through the planning process we can:

  • make clearer choices about growth.
  • define clear lines of responsibility for different aspects of the growth process.
  • have a more precise and clear budgeting process that "triggers" in real time.
  • connect the budget, scheduling, staffing, and marketing processes.
  • have clear objectives for each "scheduler".
  • develop long-range planning for programs, space, etc.
  • develop multi-year financial models.
  • move to a precision scheduling model.
  • put all resources to work.

 

II.  RELATIONSHIP TO STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS

 

The following Guiding Principles for Enrollment Planning have been established at Valencia College. These Guiding Principles are fully aligned with the Valencia College Mission and Values Vision, Mission, Values and Statutory Purpose , and the Strategic Learning Plan.

The Guiding Principles for Enrollment Planning at Valencia CommunityCollege are:

 
  • Accountability.
  • Accessibility (understanding that students want flexibility, many options, ability to manage their cash with good financial stewardship).
  • Inclusion.
  • Dignity and respect for all.
  • Passion for Excellence and Quality.
  • Financial Stewardship.
  • Resource Stewardship.

 

At Valencia College , we believe that Enrollment Planning is most effective when it includes the following best practices:

 

  • Thoughtful planning that is data driven (based on community needs, market analysis,) and based on Valencia 's strategic priorities.
  • Evidence based on measurable outcomes.
  • Student and learning centered.
  • Fully uses all providers and modes of delivery.
  • Maintains standards of excellence.
  • Monitors and maintains satisfaction level of students (including timely graduation, courses offered on-demand and through multiple delivery modes).
  • All units are coordinated/connected to provide best service.
  • All employees are developed and understand their role in the process.
  • Is cost effective.
  • Rewards excellence in operation and results.
  • Students agree on the established principles.

 

III.  VITAL ISSUES

The purpose of Valencia's Strategic Enrollment Plan is to improve Student Learning Performance by:

A.  Reducing Chaos for students by implementing and

     constantly improving precision scheduling.

B.  Increasing Investment in Student Learning by improving

     Valencia's financial performance. 

This may be conceptualized as illustrated in the following charts.

Enrollment Management Charts

 

IV.  RESPONSE TO VITAL ISSUES

When looking at the vital issues identified above the following questions must be asked:

  • How can we begin to produce and implement precision scheduling so that complexity and unpredictability is reduced for students.
  • How can we increase the investment in Student Learning?
  • How can we improve Valencia's financial performance?

This (What? Answers to questions, response to issues?) can be accomplished using several strategies.

First, we must look at the schedule as an operational plan.  The schedule generates revenue which in turn is used for discretionary resources. The schedule should be built based upon the best estimate of student need to fulfill their educational plans. This estimate of student need is used to assure that learning support (courses, textbooks, software, technology labs, etc.) is aligned with student need in a timely fashion. All stakeholders in the college have access to the same enrollment and tuition estimates. All resources are aligned with our strategic needs.

Second, we must connect the schedule and budget directly to the college-wide learning plan. This would include sharing our best thinking with students to impact their progress and success, creating new and expanded systems that support better advising and counseling interactions, expanding and strengthening the role of faculty as advisors and mentors, and removing the challenges that exist in our processes so that a student' s college experience becomes more predictable and less stressed.

The objectives of our Precision Scheduling Process are to:

  • Fulfill the enrollment plan.
  • Meet student needs.
  • Minimize the number of classes canceled and added.
  • Guarantee the course schedule.
  • Plan on an annual and multi-year basis.

The predicted and anticipated outcomes of the Precision Scheduling Process are:

  • Mutually agreed upon budgets for staffing both adjunct and full-time faculty.
  • Planned and precise resource management.
  • Effective and efficient staffing.
  • Student average course loads increased.
  • Improved services to students.

The long term impact of enrollment planning and precision scheduling for Valencia College should be:

  • Earlier counseling and advising for students.
  • The ability of students to plan beyond one term.
  • A strong basis for faculty involvement in advising
  • Program continuity.
  • Less complexity and unpredictability equals more learning.
  • More students achieve their stated goals.
  • Increased number of graduates.
  • Increased amount of time and effort for administrators to spend on other leadership and management responsibilities.  

 

V.  PRECISION SCHEDULE DEVELOPMENT

1.  Begin with enrollment planning at each level of the organization

2.  Develop schedule to meet established enrollment goals

3.  Reaffirm recent enrollment trends of prospective new returning

     students

4.  Analyze strategic growth in specific program areas

5.  Estimate enrollments for each course; number of sections needed

6.  Review schedule based on Student Preferences Term Schedule

     Checklist

7.  Compile by course, departments, division, college

8.  Review and adjust in cross department teams, including student

     services; apply patterns that are student friendly

9.  Confirm total student demand and college commitment

10.  Build a revenue model

       a.  Estimate revenue from enrollment above

       b.  Modify for residency, exemptions, etc.

       c.  Create reserve/response fund as appropriate

11.  Build cost model

       a.  Estimate in every discipline and department the in-load,   

            overload,  adjunct distribution to the schedule

       b.  Adjust for retirements, new-hires, etc.

       c.  Adjust for reassignments  

       d.  Build a faculty assignment database for the year and assign

            costs to each assignment

12.  Build a schedule management system

       a.  Identify "reserve" sections that will not be initially published

            (about 3-5  of most populous courses)

       b.  Determine the decision process and timing for opening these

            sections in response to demand

       c.  In early stages, agree on decision rules for canceling sections

       d.  Create accountability reports for every department to track

            effectiveness of scheduling (cancellations, additions,

            class size, student drop/add rates, faculty feedback on first

            week, student services feedback)

 

VI.  Environmental Scan/Data

The mission of Valencia College is as follows:

Valencia Community College provides outcomes-oriented, quality learning opportunities by:

  • Achieving, measuring, and applying the results of learning.
  • Emphasizing critical and creative thinking, effective communication, collaboration, and workplace skills.
  • Maintaining an open-minded, nurturing, and collaborative environment.
  • Reaching out to potential students and providing affordable, accessible learning opportunities.
  • Fostering enthusiasm for lifelong learning.
  • Motivating learners to define and achieve their goals.
  • Respecting uniqueness and appreciating diversity.
  • Encouraging faculty and staff to continue professional growth.
  • Partnering with businesses, industries, public agencies, civic groups, and educational institutions that support learning and promote the economic development of Central Florida.

In order to develop a strategic enrollment plan that meets the goals outlined in our mission statement, we must first understand the changes that are occurring in our world and for the students we serve. There are many variables that have changed the higher education landscape during the past fifteen years. Some of the variables that changed are:

Changing demographics and uneven population growth. Students seeking access to higher --education are more diverse than previous generations of students in terms of many characteristics. A higher proportion of students:

  • are from minority racial or ethnic backgrounds,
  • are from geographically dispersed areas of the region and world,
  • have learning and physical challenges,
  • come from lower socioeconomic levels,
  • demonstrate limited academic preparation to do college work,
  • come from homes where English is not the first language,
  • work part-time or full-time,
  • have families to support.

Rise in need for college education and workforce training -
Most jobs today demand some college education.

 

Globalization - Increasingly, technology makes it possible for potential students from around the world to seek to enroll at Valencia for on site or distance learning opportunities. The curricula in which students enroll must reflect global concerns, particularly as employers look for employees with an appreciation of international and inter-cultural issues.

 

New market forces -  Private, for profit universities, and corporate universities are eagerly seeking students whose main option to attend college in the past was the "traditional" college.

Increasing expectations from students and parents - Students expect colleges to be student centered and responsive to their needs.  They expect good and convenient service when they want the service, in the manner they want it and personalized to meet their particular needs.  That is why distance education programs and on-line degrees programs have grown dramatically during the past ten years. This need will continue to grow as students continue to request "college on demand," classes when they want them and in the learning modality in which they want to learn.  Students, and their parents, also want academic and co-curricular programs that are relevant and timely to them. 

 

Federal, state, and local accountability - Governments and businesses want students to reach their educational objectives in a timely manner and with knowledge and skills relevant to today's market needs.

 

Changing funding models - Federal and state funding streams will increasingly be tied to performance, directly through fund set aside for that purpose, or less directly as legislative bodies weigh performance in allocating funds to the higher education sector. At the same time, the College will compete for increasingly scarce resources for its operational and capital needs. Performance in terms of meeting our mission by serving students will be essential if we are to meet our organization's fiscal needs.

 

Changing enrollment patterns - There are growing numbers of students who want access to college who are different from the "traditional" college student of the past.  There are more non-traditional students, more re-entry, more adult learners, and more career-oriented students.  [Environmental scanning data that addressed these issues was collected and analyzed in the Development of the Valencia College Enrollment Plan. The Chief Learning Officer, Provosts, Deans, faculty leaders, assistant vice presidents, institutional research staff, and others were involved in the analysis.

Enrollment Data - Current enrollment conditions were examined. Market conditions were examined to determine where new programs need to be started and/or old programs expanded, where market penetration needs to be adjusted, and where the student profile needs to be adjusted.

Course offerings ( capacity, scheduling, duplication, wait lists) - Course offering information was analyzed to identify unused capacity (opportunities for growth), to identify unmet demand (where we need to invest resources), and to pinpoint areas where resources need to be recovered (programs that have reached a plateau and no longer meet community/student needs).

Retention Information - Retention information was analyzed to determine where and why students were dropping out and/or stopping out.

Market surveys - Market surveys were analyzed to determine unmet student and community needs.

Financial aid and scholarships - Annual reports were analyzed for distribution of types of aid and characteristics of students on aid to identify areas to leverage financial aid programs to targeted groups in order to increase access and enrollment.

Financial Information (income streams and expenditures) - Financial data were data was analyzed to determine both revenue and expenditures needed to support enrollment growth. The budget was developed so that it meets the best estimate of student needs.

Dual Enrollment - Trends in enrollment by high school were analyzed to identify areas for expansion of enrollments at the high school campuses and on Valencia campuses.

Data and Situational/Needs Analysis - A task force of the College Planning Council analyzed over 60 sets of data about the College and the community in September - October 2006, and shared seven key points that will shape the College's future based on their review. The key points are:

1.   Demand for higher education will grow in Central Florida due to continuing population increases, changes in the employment market, and workforce vacancies as baby boomers retire. While high school graduates will increase, the proportion earning a standard diploma will decline. University admissions limits will increase the number of students starting at community colleges.

2.   The students in our future will be increasingly diverse in background and needs . Younger students will prefer non-traditional methods of learning. Prospective students over age 44 (a group that will increase at a higher rate than will the younger population) will be interested in career changes and growth, weighing the investment of their time in education as a cost.

3.   Educational options available to students will continue to evolve. Private institutions will increase in number and enrollments, and financial aid policies and availability will make it possible for students to attend higher cost private institutions if they choose.

4.   Working to improve learning results, and to document those improvements, will continue to challenge the College and our students. The College can expect increased community interest in how it can partner to increase high school graduation rates and improve college readiness. As students move on to their first experiences at Valencia , a large number will struggle, and we will need more information about why this is the case. As learning technologies evolve, the College will need more information about which students can be successful with different learning modalities, such as web-based courses.

5.   The community's needs and related expectations are changing. More employees will be required who readily learn and adapt to new technologies, who work effectively and serve people from other cultures, and who contribute to solving societal and global problems. Employment in the biological sciences, health care, high-technology fields, business, construction, hospitality, and teaching will experience highest local demand. Cries for public accountability will intensify, adding to the need to collect, analyze and report to the public, and to improve our assessment of learning.

6.   Valencia 's costs of doing business will continue to rise, and so must our revenues.  Our needs will exceed available State funds, meaning that we must continue to seek alternative revenue through gifts, grants, and revenue-generating activities. Significant investments in land, new facilities, renovations, and technologies will be required in a marketplace in which scarcity of many resources will drive up costs. Competition for qualified personnel and the need for the development of new leaders will intensify as baby boomers retire.

7.   Defining community (which is, in fact, our middle name) is increasingly complicated and increasingly important. Just as the members of our immediate families are less likely to all live in one geographic location, it is increasingly difficult to pinpoint geographically the "community" that we serve or could serve, both due to technology opening up distance learning options, and due to growing numbers of people world-wide looking to Orlando as a place to come for higher education. Valencia will be expected to contribute to solving problems, both natural and human-made, that have no geographic boundaries, such as worldwide health crises, disaster recovery, or the prevention of violence. What we do here and now as we plan for 2008-13 will make a difference to our community, no matter how broadly or narrowly we define it.

 

VII.  DATA ANALYSIS

All decisions concerning enrollment are made after careful data analysis. Five important sets of data analysis occur: Trend data analysis, Schedule analysis, Enrollment data analysis, Financial analysis, and Budge process analysis.

 

A.   Trend Data Analysis: Valencia 's analysis of trend data begins with two very important questions:

What are the business and industry needs for the community Valencia serves?

How are we responding to business and industry needs?

 

In order to answer these questions, provosts, deans, and program directors review the following data:

•  U.S. Occupational Employment for Occupations Requiring

    Postsecondary Training or Associate's Degree Annual Projections

    (currently 2004 to 2014)

•  Region 12 Occupational Employment Projections

•  Targeted Occupations List - Number of Annual Openings in Region
•  Job Growth By Occupational Group
•  Occupation Linked to Program (Dept of Ed)
•  Wage Earning for Occupation:
Targeted Occupation - Mean Wage - $11.39/Hour
High Skill/High Wage - Mean Wage - $17.86/Hour
State Approved AS Programs not Offered at Valencia

B.   Schedule Analysis from the previous year (sections, canceled, additions): As preparation for scheduling, class sections are analyzed for trends in offerings at various times of days and in different modalities. The projected schedule is then established to meet the needs of students .

 

C.   Enrollment Data Analysis: After reviewing the data and determining the enrollment health of each program, recommendations are made for improving existing program, as well as, discontinuation of programs no longer needed in the community. The following issues are considered in the program review.

 

1.   Program Outcomes

      Factors to Assess Program Outcomes:

  • Enrollment/Student Interest
  • Completion
  • Placement Rate
  • Licensure Rates (if apply)
  • Earnings of Graduates/Completers

2.   Complete Health & Viability Assessment

 
3.   Identify and Indicate Program Growth
 
4.   Findings and Recommendations:
  • Curriculum Modifications & New Programs
  • Strategies to Enhance Enrollment & Capacity
  • Potential Articulation Agreements
  • Online Course Development

D.   Financial Analysis :

Revenue Model

  • Estimate revenue from enrollment
  • Modify for residency, exemptions, etc.
  • Create reserve/response fund as appropriate

 

Cost Model

  • Estimate in every discipline and department the in-load, overload, adjunct distribution to the schedule
  • Adjust for retirements, new-hires, etc.
  • Adjust for reassignments
  • Build a faculty assignment database for the year and assign costs to each assignment

E.   Business Process Analysis for Budgeting

 

How does Budgeting support or fulfill the Precision Schedule? Budget's primary responsibility is to coordinate the budget process in a manner that encourages good healthy communications and results in the best all location of the resources necessary to support the enrollment plan and generate the necessary funds.

 

Beginning of the process: What is the first step in the process? Using broad assumptions for our enrollment goals and expense patterns, we will develop a preliminary budget that will give us some idea of the resources available and the known costs.

 

End: When is the process complete? The process is complete when a more refined budget is prepared after input from each area as to staffing needs, marketing costs, and other expenses necessary to successfully obtain the desired enrollment.

 

Actors: Who are the people who actually touch the process? Every area

Stakeholders: Who are the people affected by the process? Every area of the college will be involved in this process.

 

Process: What are the action steps in the process? With input from the President and the senior staff, assumptions will be developed in order to generate a preliminary budget. This information will be used by the other groups to establish budgeting parameters. As specific staffing and resource allocation plans are developed by the various groups, a more refined budget will be established. Buy in that the budgeted resources are adequate to accomplish the enrollment objectives is necessary.

 

Where is the Pain? What are the challenges to this process? Moving from the perceived entitlements of base plus budgeting to more precision allocation of resources based on our enrollment objectives.

 

Wish List/Action Items: What would make the pain go away? Everyone obtaining a better understanding of the interrelationships of each unit (marketing, admissions, deans, grounds, etc.) in the fulfillment of the college's objectives. This along with all of us developing a willingness to share and even give up resources in order for everyone to be more successful.

 

VIII.  GOALS

Over the last several years enrollment has flattened. This flattening of enrollment is due to several major factors. These factors include but are not limited to:

  • purposefully lowering enrollment in order to align enrollment with finances
  • several bad hurricane seasons
  • a rebounding economy and low unemployment
  • not meeting student demands for alternative delivery of courses
  • Start Right initiatives
  • decline in dual-enrollment classes

 

In order to begin growing enrollment and revenue again, a new Strategic Enrollment Management System of planning has been initiated. Valencia Community College plans to grow enrollment strategically through precision scheduling based on both financial modeling and continuous enrollment analysis.

 

For the coming academic year, course enrollment patterns and student marketing surveys indicate that there is a demand for distance and flex-scheduled courses exceeding our supply. While graduation rates in our traditional AA (transfer) degree program remains constant, there is a considerable increase in the graduation rates for the Technical Certificate and AS degree programs.

Goal 1: Enrollment Targets

Valencia will increase student enrollment by 5-6% from Fall 2006 to Fall 2007.

 

Goal 2: Program Mix

Valencia will expand programs identified with available capacity and room to grow, as well as, expand programs where there has been a need identified in the annual occupational openings data.

 

Goal 3: Program Delivery

Valencia will increase the number of alternative delivery classes courses and flex-start classes by 15% from Fall 2006 to Fall 2007.

 

Goal 4: Income Targets

Valencia will increase income by to meet budget needs.

 

Goal 5: Services

Valencia will provide all necessary services to accommodate the increase in enrollment envisioned by this plan.

 

Goal 6: Stewardship/management

Valencia will provide the stewardship and management necessary to meet the enrollment challenges that will result from this plan.

 

IX.  KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

 

Institutional Positioning

 

Baseline

Summer 2006

Performance

Summer 2007

Baseline

Fall 2006

Performance

Fall 2007

Baseline

Spring 2007

Performance

Spring 2008

Tuition and Fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profile of entering students (Demographics to include race/ethnicity, gender, age)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retention Rates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity and Demand

 

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Available capacity to handle enrollment growth

 

 

Projected changes to operating and fixed costs with enrollment changes

 

 

Top 10 competitors

 

 

Education and General Expenditures (avg cost to educate student)

 

 

Cost analysis of Direct/Indirect costs based on FTE

 

 

Distribution of admitted and enrolled students by income and/or need level (financial aid - % in each demographic or sub-group)

 

 

Student demand as measured through application to enrollment yield

 

 

 

 

Financial Aid Policies

 

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Award "gaps" between student need and actual awards

 

 

Percentage of need met/aid awarded in each year of the student's career

 

 

Yield rates by need level and academic ability level

 

 

Yield rates by key enrollment shaping goals (academic program, geographical area, ethnicity, talent, students)

 

 

Financial aid by academic ability

 

 

Family income distribution in your primary student markets to assess "ability to pay"

 

 

Application to completion of Financial Aid

 

 

 

 

Student Marketing, Recruitment, and Retention

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Marketing and recruitment activities

 

 

Advertising cost/student by applicant, applied/enrolled, new students

 

 

Conversion rates for each stage of your recruitment funnel-inquiry to application, application to assessment, assessment to orientation, orientation to registration, registration to payment--and comparison with national data

 

 

Institutional image perception study for each relevant prospective student market

 

 

 

 

Applicant/Enrolled

 

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Yield (enrolled) rates for each subpopulation (Demographics to include race/ethnicity, gender, age)

 

 

Retention and graduation rates of subpopulations

 

 

Per student financial aid levels for sub- populations

 

 

Average hours taken per students by sub-population

 

 

 

 

Educational Capacity and Demand

 

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Current and projected capacities for each course, academic program, and classroom

 

 

Current and projected student demands for each course, academic program, and classroom

 

 

Lost net revenues for each over demand and under enrolled situation

 

 

Average cost to deliver each program per student

 

 

 

 

Student Performance

 

Baseline

Academic Yr 2006-2007

Performance

Academic Yr 2007-2008

Retention and financial impact analysis (fall to fall - population by sub-group)

 

 

Retention and financial impact analysis (fall to spring - population by sub-group)

 

 

Graduation rate data and financial impact

 

 

Retention of 3-peats (measure of 100% fee)

 

 

 

X.  STRATEGIES

Strategies have been identified and developed in the following areas to accomplish the desired increase in FTE for the designated academic year:

 

  • Program Mix and Class Capacity Strategies
  • Marketing and Recruitment StrategiesRetention Strategies
  • Policy and Procedure Strategies
  • Financial Strategies
  • Financial Aid Strategies
  • Dual Enrollment Strategies
  • Campus Strategies

East Campus Enrollment Management Plan

Osceola Campus Enrollment Management Plan

West Campus Enrollment Management Plan

Winter Park Campus Enrollment Management Plan

 

XI.  ACCOUNTABILITY- STEWARDSHIP

 

Process

Steward(s)

Enrollment Planning Work Team (EPWT)

Faculty Council President, Provosts, Director of IR, IAC Chairperson, VP Administrative Services, VP for Institutional Advancement, VP for Student Affairs, VP for Human Resources and Diversity, CLO

Financial Analysis, Revenue, and Budget Planning

VP Administrative Services

Precision Scheduling and Staffing of Schedule

Provosts and Deans

Marketing Plan

VP for Institutional Advancement, Assistant VP Marketing & Media Relations

Financial Aid Plan

Asst. VP, College Transition

Registration Management

AVP Admissions & Records, AVP Student Affairs

Payment Management

AVP for Financial Services

Enrollment Funnel

VP for Student Affairs

College Transition Planning

AVP College Transition

Precision Budgeting for Staffing

AVP Budget & Logistical Services

Course/Program Completion Performance

Dean of Workforce Development, Provosts, Deans, Director of IR, Director of Assessment, AVP Curriculum and Articulation

Program Review Trends and Program Development

Dean of Workforce Development, Provosts, Deans, Director of IR, Director of Assessment, AVP Curriculum and Articulation

Employment Trends

Dean of Workforce Development, Director of IR, Director of Assessment, AVP Curriculum and Articulation

Enrollment Trends

Director of IR, VP for Student Affairs, Deans, Provosts

Enrollment Analysis

Deans, Provosts, AVPs, CLO

Student Profile Trends

Director of IR, VP for Student Affairs, Director of Assessment

Assessment Collegewide Assessment Team

A Schedule for the Enrollment Planning Processes has been established:

Enrollment Calendar

 

XII.  ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT LEARNING PLAN 

An Enrollment Management Learning Plan will be established annually that:

  • identifies areas of best practices that we need to study and that will support our plan.
  • establishes a professional development plan that will support learning of best practices.
  • identifies appropriate development activities and budgeting priorities for those development activities.

 

XIII.  ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT RESEARCH AGENDA

Enrollment management relies on research. Research should provide strategic information on College demographics, market trends and student behavior. In turn, the College can more effectively engage in data-driven decision-making to support student learning.

The following questions can help guide the research agenda for the College moving forward:

1.  What are we doing, how do we measure it, and how well are we doing it?
2.  Whom do we want to recruit and does the College sufficiently target

     market its recruitment activities?
3.  Which academic programs attract students?
4.  Which delivery modes are most effective and for which students?
5.  Does advising and counseling, orientation and student life programs

     help students adjust to the College?
6.  How do the activities, programs and services support student learning?

Other research areas for consideration:

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS:
Local and national forecasts of higher education enrollment trends

STUDENT TRENDS:
First generation college students, challenges and opportunities
Diversity in higher education (what does this mean to Valencia?)

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS:
Course information, demand analysis, closed section tracking etc.
Full- and part-time enrollment mix
Learning communities

RETENTION TRENDS:
Graduation and transfer rates
Probation/dismissal rates
Success and failure rate by program and division
Degree and program completion patterns
Remedial programs (individual metrics?)
Honors programs (individual metrics?)
Mentoring programs (does the college have them, if so, individual metrics?)
Early alert assessment and monitoring system (individual metrics?)

FACULTY TRENDS:
Professional development & training (in enrollment management practices) for both full-time and adjunct faculty
Impending retirements

MARKETING/ADVERTISING TRENDS:
Advertising (what is our target market watching?)
Direct mail
Personal contact

TECHNOLOGY:
Distance learning and use of technology
Online web advising
Online communication management module (Banner)
Student portals
Web design for Enrollment Management Program at Valencia

MARKET RESEARCH:
Job market trends and changing market demands
Economic development trends
Partnerships with business and industry and other local employers

COMPETITION TRENDS:
Proprietary institutions
Four-year colleges and universities
Other community colleges

POLICY TRENDS:
Financial aid/scholarships
Need based vs. merit
Tying funding to assessment of student performance
Admission (i.e. residency, etc.)
Homeland security
Policies and procedures (how well do these support student learning?)