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Fallero, Fall, 2015: Issue 3.1

Fallero, Fall, 2015

The Fall, 2015 issue of Fallero is now available. Please right-click the image above, choose Save as, and download. Navigate using your mouse or down-arrow key. Trying to view Fallero in your Internet browser will not allow embedded fonts to display properly, and our digital media works might not play. Therefore, we encourage you to download the issue to your computer. Also, be sure you have the latest version of Adobe Reader, available for free here.

 

 

Archived Issues

 

 

Second Year

 

 

Fallero, Spring, 2015: : Issue 2.2

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Please right-click and download if the file doesn't open automatically. To navigate, use your down-arrow key or your mouse.

About this Issue

On May 25th, 1895, one of England's least benevolent judges condemned Ireland's most sardonic wit to twenty-four months of solitary confinement, caloric as well as intellectual deprivation, and sustained, enforced silence. A graduate of both Trinity College and Oxford University, Oscar Wilde had to necessarily abandon his previous labors (hilariously eviscerating the Vapid and the Venal) for creatively-bereft drudgery: grinding grain, turning crank handles on metal drums, unspooling fibrous strands from ship-caulking rope ("picking oakum" for our Melville fans), and sewing mail bags. Ever faithful to the Moronic Penal Myth that falsely correlates Harsh Punishment with Low Recidivism, Wilde's jailers released him, at which point he began a new period of incarceration, this time existential: three-and-a-half years of lonely, self-medicated wandering and impoverishment before dying, at 46, from meningitis.

Loam stopping a beer-barrel.

What vileness could have inspired absurdly be-wigged presiding judge Sir Alfred Wills--bro-ish Alpinist, consummate bore--to declare Wilde's "the worst case [he had] ever seen"? How could an innocuous, sartorial author of immortally sublime quips (like this, via Lord Illingworth: "The only difference between the saint and the sinner is that every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future") be placed on humiliating, sadistic display atop a train platform upon his transfer to Reading Gaol? While a salacious list of gruesome offenses (in Times New Roman, no doubt) now likely scrolls upward on our ever-obedient readers' mental docket-screens, Wilde's actual "crime" embodies a tragically common example of unconscionable judicial legalese: inanely prudish, purposely obfuscating, invariably self-serving (the sort of euphemistic bastardizing preferred by all comfortably smug sycophants, be they Socrates's appointed Archon and dikastes or the infamous New Testament ménage--Pilate, Herod, the Sanhedrin that initiated the sad proceedings--who mocked, then tortured to death, a teacher no less talented [and, therefore, equally dangerous] than the Great Loquacious Greek).

"Gross indecency" read the indictment (delivered, one imagines, "in a whisper. All rose, exchanging smiles"). The prosecutor next specified Wilde's particular act of supposed lewdness: "engaging in homosexual acts."

Today, we call this "being gay."

Our Spring, 2015 issue marked the 120-year anniversary of Oscar Wilde's trial and imprisonment for violating Victorian-Era England's shameful laws depriving human beings of that One Birthright inherent to us all: the privilege to exist. Unfortunately, revisiting Wilde's final years made us realize that things haven't really changed all that much. When current Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore continues to ignore the federal ruling legalizing gay marriage (claiming, in 2002, that homosexuality is "abhorrent, immoral, detestable, a crime against nature and a violation of the laws of nature"), when nearly 80 countries still criminalize LGBT community members in one form or another (including death), we just had, again, to sigh.

This issue (as well as our Fall, 2015 collaboration with the Peace & Justice Institute) is devoted to those who are condemned for the crime of Simply Being Themselves. Our cover depicts a Reading Gaol cell similar to Wilde's (where, at times, he was confined for 23 hours a day, communication and camaraderie with fellow inmates being strictly verboten ). We furthermore scrapped the "magazine" metaphor, opting instead to construct a digital prison in the architectural vein of Jeremy Bentham's Panopticon, a theoretical structure designed to keep prisoners under perpetual surveillance by way of two very handy tools: Fear & Efficiency (few things are more valued by Apparatuses of Control than the shrewd deployment of their power). As every hapless English major knows, the Panopticon was also employed by French Uber Nerd Michel Foucault (who himself suffered emotionally and socially because of his own homosexuality--including repeated acts of self-harm and attempted suicide--before finally succumbing, at the apex of his academic celebrity, to AIDS) in his book Discipline and Punish to explain how institutions--governmental, legal, educational, religious, bureaucratic, cultural--surveil, directly or by proxy, their subjects and punish those who fail to conform. Says Foucault:

The judges of normality are present everywhere . . . it is on them that the universal reign of the normative is based; and each individual, wherever he may find himself, subjects to it his body, his gestures, his behavior, his aptitudes, his achievements.

Miraculously, during his period of subjugation, Wilde managed to resist. Permitted to write a single page each day, he eventually completed "De Profundis," a 50,000 word "letter"--part personal remonstrance against his accusers, part re-evaluation of his spirituality. Ironically (given the "moral foundations" upon which large portions of British law were shabbily constructed), he found himself contemplating another figure who had been condemned for being "different" and espousing words and ideas the institutions of His own time found unpopular--Good Old Jesus, a guy who would hang out with pretty much anyone: tax collectors, prostitutes, Pharisees, lepers, criminals, betrayers. Like Him, Fallero will always encourage and celebrate our students' voices, never more so than when their words, art, lifestyles, or ideas threaten those who seek to silence them.

We'll let Wilde himself conclude for us. From "De Profundis":

The gods are strange. It is not our vices only they make instruments to scourge us. They bring us to ruin through what in us is good, gentle, humane, loving. . . People used to say of me that I was too individualistic. I must be far more of an individualist than ever I was. I must get far more out of myself than ever I got, and ask far less of the world than ever I asked. Indeed, my ruin came not from too great individualism of life, but from too little. The one disgraceful, unpardonable, and to all time contemptible action of my life was to allow myself to appeal to society for help and protection. To have made such an appeal would have been from the individualist point of view bad enough, but what excuse can there ever be put forward for having made it? Of course once I had put into motion the forces of society, society turned on me and said, ‘Have you been living all this time in defiance of my laws, and do you now appeal to those laws for protection? You shall have those laws exercised to the full. You shall abide by what you have appealed to.’ The result is I am in gaol. Certainly no man ever fell so ignobly, and by such ignoble instruments, as I did. . . Christ, through some divine instinct in him, seems to have always loved the sinner as being the nearest possible approach to the perfection of man. His primary desire was not to reform people, any more than his primary desire was to relieve suffering. To turn an interesting thief into a tedious honest man was not his aim. He would have thought little of the Prisoners’ Aid Society and other modern movements of the kind. The conversion of a publican into a Pharisee would not have seemed to him a great achievement. But in a manner not yet understood of the world he regarded sin and suffering as being in themselves beautiful holy things and modes of perfection.

Fallero Editors

Fallero Fall, 2014: : Issue 2.1

'Twas a painful birth this time--but she's out at last.

For this installment, we decided, design-wise, to eschew our methods from the first two issues: mimicking print-based magazines. Therefore, you will see neither a traditional table of contents nor page numbers. In addition, we spent a chunk of Christmas break getting our Nerd On by learning some new software that allows us to incorporate basic animation into the design. When the issue first opens, therefore, you'll see the cover (kinda) come to life for about ten seconds.

Right-click the image below, choose "Save as," and download to your computer (if your browser is updated with the latest version of Flash, it might play for you that way):

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First Year

 

 

Fallero, Spring, 2014: Issue 1.2

Fallero is published as an "Interactive PDF." Therefore, your browser's built-in PDF reader may not properly display the file or allow its interactive features to function. We strongly suggest, then, to download the file and open in Adobe Reader, available here for free. To download, right click on the image below and choose "Save as" or "Save link as" (depending on your operating system and browser). Afterwards, go take a brief nap or Netflix it for a bit: since there's two 8-9 minute short films in this issue, the file is fairly large. Using your phone or tablet? Ha. Fallero's Awesomeness will make it explode. Please, therefore, use a computer.

Navigating the Issue:

  • using your "up" and "down" arrow keys or clicking your mouse/trackpad is the easiest way to go from page to page.
  • on the Table of Contents, clicking the page number next to each student's name will take you directly to that student's work.
  • the short films should start playing automatically, and there are controls to pause, etc.

To view/download the Spring, 2014 issue, click on the image below:

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Fallero, Fall, 2013: Issue 1.1

Fallero is published as an "Interactive PDF." Therefore, your browser's built-in PDF reader may not properly display the file or allow its interactive features to function. We strongly suggest, then, to download the file and open in Adobe Reader, available here for free. To download, right click on the image below and choose "Save as" or "Save link as" (depending on your operating system and browser).

Navigating the Issue:

  • using your "up" and "down" arrow keys or clicking your mouse/trackpad is the easiest way to go from page to page.
  • on the Table of Contents, clicking the image next to each student's name will take you directly to that student's work.

Fallero, Fall, 2013

 

Fallero? No Comprendo

"Fallero" is the name given to one who attends the annual arts and cultural festival called Las Fallas that takes place each Spring in Valencia, Spain. Learn all about it here: Las Fallas.

Why Fallero?

Several reasons: one, its obvious "Valencia" theme (we know--it's all about oranges, historically speaking, but we enjoy taking liberties with the truth); two, both the word and the Las Fallas festival in general embody the fiery celebration of art and culture—just like the magazine itself; and three, it reflects the important role of Hispanic culture at Valencia (East Campus in particular) as well as in our surrounding community.

What We Do

Each Fall and Spring semester, Fallero publishes the best student work at Valencia in a variety of categories: poetry, fiction/creative non-fiction, scholarly essays, photography/fine arts, and digital media. Moreover, for each category, we offer a monetary reward for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places ($75, $50, & $35, respectively: Thanks, Student Development!).

How We Do It

All digitally. Using the latest in digital publishing software and technologies, Fallero can publish not only traditional text-based work but also high-resolution photography,

illustrations, paintings, and digital video. As a result, students passionate about nearly every academic and creative discipline at Valencia have the chance to have their work celebrated--with the whole universe. Neat.

Want to Submit?

Click on the Submit Your Work link above.