Oral Footnotes Continued

It is common for newspaper articles, books, web sites and other sources to quote other sources in the course of an article. Be sure to quote the original source  (person or organization) of the information in your oral footnote and then the article in which you found that information on your works cited page.

For example, in a March 24, 2010 article in the Orlando Sentinel, columnist Mike Thomas quoted Bill McCollum: "The U.S. Constitution grants no authority to Congress to compel citizens to purchase health insurance when those citizens choose not to enter the health-care market" (B1).

If you used this quotation from Bill McCollum in a speech you would say something like this:  According to Bill McCollum, Attorney General for the State of Florida, "The U.S. Constitution grants no authority to Congress to compel citizens to purchase health insurance when those citizens choose not to enter the health-care market."

Your Works Cited page would include the full citation for the newspaper article that included this quote:

Thomas, Mike. "Health Care: Can It Stand Up to the Challenges?" Orlando Sentinel 24 Mar. 2010: B1.

                Newsbank. Web. 13 July 2010.

Notice that the full citation does not mention Bill McCollum; it is not necessary to go back and find the original source for Mike Thomas' quotation and include it on your Works Cited Page. But it is necessary to mention Bill McCollum as the sources of the words in your oral footnote.

Incorrect Examples:

According to the Orlando Sentinel, "The U.S. Constitution grants no authority to Congress to compel citizens to purchase health insurance when those citizens choose not to enter the health-care market."

According to Mike Thomas, "The U.S. Constitution grants no authority to Congress to compel citizens to purchase health insurance when those citizens choose not to enter the health-care market."

These are not the words of Mike Thomas nor the official position of the Orlando Sentinel.

 


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