Strategic Learning Goal 7: Learning Works

Position Valencia as a powerful and effective community partner for creating a learning workforce in a knowledge economy.

Goal Team Report September 2002


Table of Contents

Goal Team Charge and Membership……………………………………….    page 2

Learning Works Outcomes and Action Agenda……………………………     page 3

Indicators of Progress………………………………………………………   page 4

Action Agenda Item 1 (IT Initiative)……………………………………….     page 5

Action Agenda Item 2 (Guarantee for IT Program Completers)…………...      page 8

Action Agenda Item 3 (Health Initiative)…………………………………..      page 9

Action Agenda Item 4 (Sonography and Radiologic Technology)………...        page 11

Action Agenda Item 5 (Re-branding of Valencia Institute)………………...       page 13

Action Agenda Item 6 (Expanded Presence of Valencia Institute)………...       page 15

Action Agenda Item 7 (Global Languages Institute)……………………….      page 16

Action Agenda Item 8 (Strategic Training Fund)…………………………..      page 17

Action Agenda Item 9 (Program Review Process)…………………………     page 18

 

Learning Works Goal Team

 

Charge: to assess the College’s effectiveness in meeting Goal 7 of the Strategic Learning Plan through the measurement of specified Indicators of Progress. The indicators addressed in this report are based on data that have been provided by various constituencies throughout the College. This report includes: (1) the data used by the team to review progress toward attainment of Goal 7, and (2) the team’s recommendations for future action agenda items related to the goal.

 

Co-Chairs

Lisa Armour and Bill Gombash

 

Team Members

Kim Adams-Long, Suzette Dohany, Elizabeth Eschbach, Sophia Graff, Tim Grogan, Chris Klinger, Donnie McGovern, Melvin Middleton, Lorraine Whipple

 

Team Resource Persons

Bill Castellano, Ron Nelson

 

Data and Information Resources

Elizabeth Gombash, Paul McNamara, Ruth Prather, Joan Tiller

 

 


Goal 7: Learning Works

 

Position Valencia as a powerful and effective community partner for creating a learning workforce in a knowledge economy.

 

Outcomes

 

  • The economic and workforce development mission of the college is well understood and strongly supported, both internally and externally.
  • The College focuses resources quickly and effectively to meet emerging workforce needs.
  • The College’s collegiate and continuing education programs in workforce skills are national leaders and local treasures
  • External partners support Valencia with advocacy and resources to assure our continued national leadership.

 

Strategies

7-A

Create a model that employs learning-centered principles and Core Competencies in the design, delivery, and evaluation of all corporate, continuing, and technical education programs.

7-B

Position Valencia as the major provider of high skill/high wage education and training in selected programs and provide students in those programs with a Learning Guarantee.

7-C

Create strong, strategic partnerships to enhance Valencia’s role in economic development to achieve specific workforce education and training outcomes.

7-D

Fully integrate workforce development into the culture and curriculum of the college through expanded opportunities to connect faculty, staff, and students to business/industry and the workplace.

7-E

Design and implement a plan that supports and communicates Valencia’s role in community building.

 

Action Agenda

 

  1. Continue to expand the IT initiative and report annual progress and yield in the programs; implement new degree programs to meet industry needs.
  2. Develop and implement a meaningful “Guarantee” for IT program completers.
  3. Develop an expanded Health Initiative to provide significantly larger numbers of well-trained health professionals to the community.
  4. Strengthen Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Radiologic Technology programs with renewed facilities, equipment, and additional faculty.
  5. Re-brand Corporate and Continuing Professional education as the Valencia Institute and “grow the business.”
  6. Expand the presence of the Valencia Institute throughout the college district, including all campus locations.
  7. Implement the Global Languages and Cultures Institute.
  8. Expand Valencia’s economic development impact by creating and deploying a Strategic Training Fund for immediate response to client needs for relocation or expansion related training.
  9. Revise the program review process for workforce programs to include learning-centered principles.

Goal 7: Learning Works

Indicators of Progress

(sanctioned by the appropriate College councils and review teams)

 

  1. Success rates for licensure, standard examinations, wages and placement of leavers, completers, and graduates (include analysis of segments served by courses and programs).
  2. Growth in participation of individuals and corporations in the Valencia Institute.
  3. Growth in measures of the business model for the Valencia Institute.
  4. Satisfaction of corporate clients.

 

As the goal team gathered and analyzed the data, additional indicators were added as appropriate and other factors were noted when relevant.

 

 

 

Recommendations Regarding the Indicators of Progress for Goal 7:

Valencia College uses the Florida Education Training & Placement Information Program (FETPIP) for tracking wages and placement of former students.   It is noteworthy that FETPIP data in general, and this year’s data in particular, provides statistical placement rates that may be flawed. Former students who are not located by the program are not counted when placement rates are computed, so that a 100% placement rate may be quoted when information on only a fraction of a school’s former students is available.   Furthermore, former students who are located but whose work place or job title do not allow an analyst to infer whether or not they are working in-field are not counted either. For instance, an IT graduate working at a theme park may be working in-field or may be doing crowd control. Discernment may not be possible based on the data supplied. Even when inferences are made, there is a degree of guesswork involved.

 

It was decided that this goal team report would not include placement rates. It is recommended that any report that does include placement rates from FETPIP include clarification on the limitations of FETPIP data.

 

It is further recommended that Valencia either devise its own tracking processes for former students, or develop an alternative indicator of progress.   If tracking is deemed necessary for assessment, then a reliable, internally validated basis for tracking is needed. The goal team does not recommend attempting to “build a better FETPIP,” but does recommend institutional deliberation on the kinds of statistics that will aid assessment of programs and careful consideration of the feasibility of obtaining them. According to Institutional Research, previous experience with surveying alumni via the U.S. mail yielded a response rate of about 14%, with at least 30% of the surveys returned as undeliverable.

 

Fewer leavers are located by FETPIP than graduates and completers. Wages and placement of leavers cannot be confidently stated based on FETPIP data. It is recommended that the benefits of tracking leavers be articulated and weighed. If tracking is warranted, appropriate tracking processes should be devised. Otherwise, wages and placement of leavers should not continue to be part of Indicator 1.

 

 

Action Agenda Item 1: Continue to expand the IT initiative and report annual progress and yield in the programs; implement new degree programs to meet industry needs.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Ruth Prather

 

The goal of the joint IT Initiative is to produce 15,000 IT workers in three years through training programs offered at Lake-Sumter Community College, Seminole Community College, and Valencia College. Targeted Valencia IT programs include A.S. Degree and Certificate Programs in Computer Engineering Technology, Computer Programming and Analysis, Computer Information Technology, Database Technology, E-Business Technology, Digital Media Technology, and Graphics Technology. IT continuing education courses offered through the Valencia Institute are also included.

 

There were 8,242 students (unduplicated) enrolled in 2001-02 who completed varying lengths of IT training (Levels 1-3). Accumulated credits for students enrolled in 2001-02 include historical IT coursework. Students in one training level are not included in the other training levels.

 

There were 13,639 students (unduplicated) enrolled in 2001-02 who completed 1 to 8 college credits in IT courses. This includes historical IT coursework completed prior to 2001-02 but only students enrolled in 2001-02 are included in the unduplicated count. Students in pre-level training are not included in training levels 1,2, or 3.

 

JOINT IT INITIATIVE - 2001-02

LENGTH OF TRAINING

LSCC

SCC

Valencia

TOTAL

Level 1

 

 

 

 

9 college credits of IT courses

118

419

702

1,239

150 contact hours

Continuing Education

0

0

5

5

Vocational Credit Programs

0

6

2

8

Certification preparation of

<9 college credits

375

578

710

1,663

<150 contacts

Continuing Education

565

159

977

1,701

Vocational Credit Programs

0

0

0

0

Total

1,058

1,162

2,396

4,616

Level 2

 

 

 

 

12 college credits of IT courses

68

281

414

763

200 contact hours

Continuing Education

0

0

0

0

Vocational Credit Programs

0

9

0

9

Total

68

290

414

772

Level 3

 

 

 

 

15+ college credits of IT courses

149

1,122

1,266

2,537

250+ contact hours

Continuing Education

0

0

0

0

Vocational Credit Programs

0

271

46

317

Total

149

1,393

1,312

2,854

Grand Total

1,275

2,845

4,122

8,242

Pre-Level (1-8 college credits of IT courses)

1,461

3,385

8,793

13,639

               

 


Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

Indicator 1: Success rates for licensure, standard examinations, wages and placement of leavers, completers, and graduates (include analysis of segments served by courses and programs).

 

 

1999-2000

2000-01

Wage Rates

Completers

Vocational Certificate

Computer Programming for Individuals with Disabilities

$35,884 per

year

$35,920 per year

Graduates

A.S. Computer Programming and Applications

$31,020

$31,384

A.S. Graphic Design Technology/Graphics Technology

$22,372

$25,336

           

 

Wage rates are not yet available for A.S. degrees in Computer Engineering Technology, Computer Information Technology, Database Technology, Digital Media Technology, and E-Business Technology. These degree programs are new offerings as of academic year 2001/02.

 

Recommendation Regarding Indicator 1: Data is not currently collected on students taking or completing IT standard examinations or achieving licensure. The goal team recommends that this data be collected in the future. That task is likely to present significant challenges, but success rates for licensure and standard examinations are important indicators of progress in IT.

 

Additional Indicators:

 

2000-01

2001-02

Change

Number of IT A.S. Degree/Certificate programs

6

17

+11

Number of IT industry certifications (courses offered)

7

15

+8

Number of IT industry certifications (preparation offered)

Valencia Institute

7

12

+5

A.S. Degree/Certificate Programs

6

12

+6

Number of full-time IT faculty

26

36

+10

IT enrollment

14,108

15,951

+13%

Number of IT graduates/completers

 

 

A.S. Computer Engineering Technology

NA

5

 

A.S. Computer Information Technology

NA

2

 

A.S. Computer Programming and Applications

41

48

+2

Computer Programming (Tech. Cert.)

33

55

+22

Computer Programming for Individuals with Disabilities (Voc. Cert.)

6

12

+6

A.S. Database Technology

NA

2

 

Database Administrator – Oracle (Tech. Cert.)

NA

8

 

A.S. Graphic Design Technology/Graphics Technology

32

41

+9

           

 

Baseline data is provided for graduates and completers in Computer Engineering Technology, Computer Information Technology, and Database Technology, new offerings as of academic year 2001/02.

 

Other Significant Factors in 2001-02:

 

  • Marketing efforts for IT were expanded in 2001-02. The marketing materials produced for IT in 2001-02 emphasize Valencia’s commitment to learning. For example, a consistent feature of the materials is a list headed “Students will learn to…”
  • More information about IT Career Paths were developed and provided to advisors/counselors.

 

  • A comprehensive “Career Book” has been prepared. It includes information on IT careers and corresponding Valencia program offerings in a colorful format likely to appeal to students.

 

General Recommendation:

The number of Pre-Level students is substantially higher than the total number of students in Levels 1 through 3. The Goal Team recommends reducing this difference by exploring ways to enhance advisement, marketing, and/or persistence strategies to increase the number of Pre-Level students who enroll in and successfully complete additional IT courses, reaching at least Level 1.


Action Agenda Item 2: Develop and implement a meaningful “Guarantee” for IT program completers.

 

Governing Council:    Executive Council

Primus:                       Joan Tiller

 

In October 2001, a Task Force identified the benefits and potential for outsourcing job placement services using local staffing agencies for selected or all A.S., and Certificate programs, including IT programs. Outsourcing is being explored to improve job placement opportunities for students.

 

As a result of the Task Force, a survey was developed and sent to 70 local staffing agencies requesting information about services currently provided, industry sectors in which services are provided, cost of services, responsibility for payment of services, and placement success. A total of 19 local staffing agencies responded to the survey, and the results are currently being compiled.

 

In June or July 2002, the Task Force will invite selected staffing agencies that replied to the survey to meet and discuss potential partnerships and program areas that could benefit from the outsourcing of placement services.


Action Agenda Item 3: Develop an expanded Health Initiative to provide significantly larger numbers of well-trained health professionals to the community.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Paul Kinser

 

Valencia is currently in the midst of an aggressive effort to respond to the community’s healthcare needs. Partners for a Healthy Community is a task force that has been meeting regularly since January 2001. Consisting of representatives from area colleges, universities, hospitals, and healthcare facilities, the task force is addressing the shortage of healthcare workers in Central Florida, identifying the areas of greatest need and developing a continuously evolving plan to meet those needs.

 

New students to enter each program by year

Program

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Registered Nurse

40

50

200

 

One result of this partnership has been the establishment of a three-year plan to dramatically expand the number of students admitted to the RN training programs at Valencia. Valencia currently admits approximately 168 students per year into its RN program. The new three-year plan includes increasing the number of students accepted into the generic RN program and establishing a new evening and weekend program designed to accommodate individuals who are currently healthcare professionals.

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

Indicator 1: Success rates for licensure, standard examinations, wages and placement of leavers, completers, and graduates (include analysis of segments served by courses and programs).

 

 

1999-2000

2000-01

Success rates for licensure

Emergency Medical Technician

91%

196 of 218

Paramedic

91%

61 of 61

A.S. Dental Hygiene

96% state

100% national

19 of 19

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

 

(national boards are voluntary for sonography; there are three exams in all)

 

1 of 9 has passed all 3,

2 of 9 have passed 2,

3 of 9 have passed 1

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

94%

15 of 15

A.S. Respiratory Care

92%

14 of 15

A.S. Nursing RN

84%

100 of 113

Wage rates (annual)

 

 

 

 

Completers

Vocational Certificate

Emergency Medical Technician

$26,484

*

Paramedic

$49,028

*

Graduates

A.S. Dental Hygiene

$39,048

*

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

 

*

A.S. Emergency Medical Services

$52,078

*

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

 

*

A.S. Respiratory Care

$32,268

*

A.S. Nursing RN

$36,412

*

*Data not yet available from Florida Education & Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP)

 

 

Other Significant Factors in 2001-02:

 

  • Valencia has been working with area health care systems to address the shortage of registered nurses and other allied health professionals. Florida Hospital, Health Central, Orlando Regional Healthcare, and Osceola Regional Medical Center have entered into contractual agreements to contribute a combined total of $720,000 to recruitment and salary support for four additional nursing faculty members this year and four more additional nursing faculty members next year.

 

  • An RN student recruitment campaign has been conducted. Valencia has mailed postcards to over 10,000 potential students who are area high school Tech Prep seniors, current Valencia students who are enrolled in the prerequisite courses, LPNs, or paramedics.

 

  • Seven out of eight new nursing faculty members have been hired.

 

  • A one-year RN advanced standing evening program for LPNs and paramedics has been designed and implemented. Forty students began this program in May of 2002.

 

  • Valencia has developed a two-year A.S. curriculum for Cardiovascular Technology (CVT).   The first class of ten will begin their program in session one of 2002-03. Orlando Regional Healthcare is contributing roughly $28,000 in the first year and $95,000 in the second year toward the salaries of a CVT Program Director and two adjunct faculty. The CVT Program Director has been hired.

 

  • Cardiovascular Technology received approximately $407,000 from an Enhancement Grant to build and equip a simulated cardiac cath lab on West Campus and recruit.

 

  • Valencia has received approval for $221,346 for the first year of a three-year Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant, “Pathways into Nursing,” through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The project is designed to bring more Hispanic students into nursing. Valencia will work specifically with Osceola and Gateway High Schools in Osceola County and Cypress Creek High School in Orange County.


Action Agenda Item 4: Strengthen Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Radiologic Technology programs with renewed facilities, equipment, and additional faculty.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Paul Kinser

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

Indicator 1: Success rates for licensure, standard examinations, wages and placement of leavers, completers, and graduates (include analysis of segments served by courses and programs).

 

There are no vocational certificates for Diagnostic Medical Sonography or Radiologic Technology, so there are no students who would be categorized as completers without graduating from these programs.

 

 

1999-2000

2000-01

Success rates for licensure/

standard exams

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

7 of 8

Data not available

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

17 of 17

19 of 19

Wage rates

(hourly)

Graduates

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

$16 - $18

*

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

NA

*

*Data not yet available from Florida Education & Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP)

 

Additional Indicators:

 

2000-01

2001-02

Change

Amount of instructional space (number of classrooms)

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

1

1

0

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

1

2

+1

Number of full-time faculty

A.S. Diagnostic Medical Sonography

1

2

+1

A.S. Radiologic Technology/Radiography

1

2

+1

           

 

  • The Diagnostic Sonography Lab is located in the back area of a classroom. The lab contains ten computer workstations, three beds, two ultrasound machines, and a simulator with two mannequins. An additional bed and an additional ultrasound machine are needed, but have not yet arrived. The lab is equipped with light boxes for viewing films, printers for the ultrasound machines, a disinfecting station for the probes, and privacy screens.

Recommendation: Since the lab is taking up a considerable amount of limited classroom space for Diagnostic Medical Sonography, it is recommended that additional instructional space be assigned.

 

  • During the summer of 2001 the Radiography Lab was completed. The lab features two energized x-ray rooms and a functioning darkroom.       It also contains accessory equipment and phantoms (body parts similar to human density), used for practicing procedures before attempting imaging of live patients.

 

  • Five computers have been added to the Radiography classroom, bringing the total to eleven. These eleven computers, along with the ten computers in the Sonography classroom, provide enough workstations to accommodate the Radiography class. An LCD projector and additional laptop were also acquired for expanded utilization of power point lectures.


Action Agenda Item 5: Re-brand Corporate and Continuing Professional Education as the Valencia Institute and “grow the business.”

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Ruth Prather

 

Over the past 24 months, the offices of Corporate Services and Continuing Professional Education have been assimilated into a single unit: Valencia Institute, corporate and continuing education. The branding initiative included a new moniker and logo, print advertising in business and trade publications, and billboards. Branding also included internal communication within the college community.

 

General Recommendation 1:   The effects of the re-branding effort have not been measured. It is recommended that appropriate focus groups be identified and consulted, so that some qualitative data on the payoffs of Valencia’s marketing effort is available. The perceptions of both clients and potential clients could be useful in focusing future efforts.

 

General Recommendation 2: Valencia Institute print advertising does not seem to reinforce or communicate the college’s learning centered initiative.   It is recommended that consideration be given to incorporating some learning language into the Institute’s messages, so that corporate clients are aware of our institutional commitment to “Learning First.”

 

Efforts to “grow the business” have included “mining” the current customer base: continuing to meet their ongoing needs with relevant and timely training and performance solutions.

 

The Valencia Institute has also made intentional operational and production efforts towards being profitable. All of the courses and programs (both corporate and public offerings) must cover, at a minimum, all direct production costs. They must also produce an acceptable operating margin that is applied to the operational costs of running the business. The Valencia Institute has adopted a financial model that enables the Institute to project and manage all facets of its operation toward the goal of profitability.

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

Indicator 2: Growth in participation of individuals and corporations in the Valencia Institute.

 

2000-01

2001-02

Change

Number of established corporate clients/accounts

70

72

+2

Number of renewed established corporate agreements

36

39

+3

Number of established corporate accounts that were expanded to other divisions

6

9

+3

Repeat rate of individual students in public (open enrollment) courses

1 in 61

1 in 61

0

 

Indicator 3: Growth in measures of the business model for the Valencia Institute.

 

2001-02 was the first academic year in which direct costs as a percentage of fee revenue were measured. The Valencia Institute reports that on average, all programs are meeting the goal not to exceed direct costs of 60% of fee revenue.

 

Recommendation Regarding Indicator 3: It is recommended that direct costs as a percentage of fee revenue for individual programs be detailed in the future.

 

Indicator 4: Satisfaction of corporate clients.

 

The Valencia Institute course evaluation form is presented at the end of each session to enrolled individuals. There are no items on the evaluation form that ask the students to assess their learning.  

 

There is not a formal mechanism for measuring the satisfaction of corporate clients, unless the assumption is made that their level of satisfaction is commensurate with that of their employees. However, Valencia Institute Account Managers meet regularly with clients to discuss issues of delivery and receive requests for enhancements to course offerings.

 

Recommendations Regarding Indicator 4:

It is recommended that a new course evaluation form be designed that asks students to assess their learning, so that the form supports Valencia’s learning centered initiative.

 

It is recommended that a process for measuring and recording the satisfaction of corporate clients as entities be developed. If the meetings between Valencia Institute Account Managers and clients are meant to serve the Institute in this regard, then it is recommended that records of the assessment information gleaned at meetings between clients and Valencia Institute Account Managers be kept so that ideas can be shared among Account Managers and so that historical assessments are available for measuring progress.


Action Agenda Item 6: Expand the presence of the Valencia Institute throughout the college district, including all campus locations.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Ruth Prather

 

In addition to internal communication during the re-branding of Valencia Institute, the Institute has engaged in multiple opportunities to expand presence and visibility.

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

See Action Agenda Item 5 for data related to:

Indicator 2: Growth in participation of individuals and corporations in the Valencia Institute.

Indicator 3: Growth in measures of the business model for the Valencia Institute.

Indicator 4: Satisfaction of corporate clients.

 

Additional Indicators:

 

 

2000-01

2001-02

Change

Number of open enrollment courses offered at Osceola Campus

65

110

+45

Number of collegewide committees and advisory boards that include participation of Valencia Institute staff

26

37

+11

Number of Valencia Institute courses offered through Leadership Valencia

17

13

-4

 

  • There is now a full-time Account Manager on site at the Osceola Campus.

 

  • Valencia Institute and corporate training web pages are now accessible through the Valencia website.

 

Other Significant Factors in 2001-02:

 

  • The Valencia Institute collaborated with Film Production Technology program in support of a Targeted Industries Grant for Women in Film.

 


Action Agenda Item 7: Implement the Global Languages and Cultures Institute.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Ruth Prather

 

The Center for Global Languages has had an impressive inaugural year. With the hiring of a director (Jennifer Robertson) and the addition of a program manager and support staff, the Center has developed from a concept to a legitimate department within the Valencia Institute.   From the foundations of a sound business plan, the director has aggressively developed the components of the department, resulting in a series of Spanish and English programs for both open enrollment students and corporate clients.

 

General Recommendation: It is recommended that the Center for Global Languages devise a timeline for expanding their programs to serve students whose first language is not English or Spanish.

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

Indicator 2: Growth in participation of individuals and corporations in the Valencia Institute.

 

2001-02

Number of established corporate clients/accounts in the Center for Global Languages

50 – 75 clients

8 accounts

Number of individual students in public (open enrollment) courses (from Enrollment and Revenue Report) in the Center for Global Languages

216

 

Indicator 3: Growth in measures of the business model for the Valencia Institute.

 

2001-02

Establishment of a business plan for the Center for Global Languages

Yes

Establishment of an advertising/media plan for the Center for Global Languages

Yes

Establishment of an instructor recruitment and development program for the Center for Global Languages

Yes

Amount of revenue (from Enrollment and Revenue Report) for the Center for Global Languages

$59,649

 

Indicator 4: Satisfaction of corporate clients.

 

The Center for Global Languages course evaluation form is presented mid-session and end of session to enrolled individuals. Items on the assessment form can be clearly related to Valencia’s learning centered initiative. Statistical summaries of course evaluation forms are provided to instructors as tools in their cycle of assessment and improvement.

 

There is not a mechanism for measuring the satisfaction of corporate clients, unless the assumption is made that their level of satisfaction is commensurate with that of their employees.

 

Recommendation Regarding Indicator 4: It is recommended that a process for measuring and recording the satisfaction of corporate clients as entities be developed.

 


Action Agenda Item 8: Expand Valencia’s economic development impact by creating and deploying a Strategic Training Fund for immediate response to client needs for relocation or expansion related training.

 

Governing Council:    Executive Council

Primus:                       Ruth Prather

 

The purpose of the fund would be to provide job specific training that is essential for the operation of new and relocated businesses in the Orlando area. Ruth Prather, Paul McNamara, and Sandy Shugart met with the Economic Development Commission (EDC) leadership to discuss models used in other states and to discuss development of a model for Central Florida. The meetings resulted in the development of the following principles:

 

  1. Valencia Community College and the Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission will be partners in this program.
  2. Representatives from both parties will be present to meet with prospects that qualify for the training funds.
  3. The focus of training opportunities will be on companies that provide primary jobs as defined by the EDC.
  4. The availability of these training funds will be a deciding factor in the companies’ relocation decision.
  5. Training dollars will only be available to new companies being recruited to the region by the EDC.
  6. The training dollars available will have a minimum impact of $50,000.

 

Through last year’s budget process, $300,000 was allocated. After September 11th, corporate moves decreased, although recently there has been more activity at the EDC. It is encouraging that Valencia provided a letter of support as part of a presentation that the EDC sent to an interested company. Sandy Shugart is working with other agencies to increase available dollars. Funding for 2002-03 will be out of the college reserve fund, not the operating budget.

 


Action Agenda Item 9: Revise the program review process for workforce programs to include learning-centered principles.

 

Governing Council:    College Learning Council

Primus:                       Paul McNamara/Joan Tiller

 

The Program Review Process and Instrument for Evaluation for the A.S. Degree and Certificate Programs has been revised and is currently in use. The process is designed for consistency and standardization for the continued evaluation and improvement of programs. In support of the college’s learning-centered principles, it provides for the review of all elements that impact student success.   The evaluation includes the review of:

 

Instructional Effectiveness Inputs

Faculty and Staff

Staff Development

Enrollment Data

Capacity and Yield

Recruitment and Promotional Activities

Instructional Materials and Supplies

Learning Environment

Equipment

Facilities

Program Budget

Grant Opportunities

Instructional Effectiveness Processes

Statement of Purpose

Admissions

Advisory Committee

Articulation and Other Agreements

Workforce and Labor Market Demands

Program Curriculum

Student Outcomes

Student Satisfaction

Student Progress and Achievement

Placement and Licensure Rate

Employer Satisfaction

       

 

A five-year plan for program reviews of A.S., and Certificate Programs has been established.   Work on a companion document for non-credit Valencia Institute programs is currently under revision.

 

Supporting Data/Indicators of Progress:

 

A.S. Degree/Certificate program reviews planned for 2001-02:

Building Construction

 

Computer Assisted Design for Individuals with Disabilities

Completed

Criminal Justice Technology

 

Dental Hygiene

External accreditation is planned to serve as program review

Drafting and Design Technology

 

Fire Science Technology

Completed

Office Systems Specialist

 

Office Systems Technology

 

PC Support for Individuals with Disabilities

Completed

 

General Recommendations:

It is recommended that internal program reviews be conducted for all programs, including those like Dental Hygiene that undergo external accreditation, unless the external accreditation is clearly built on learning-centered principles.

 

The Program Review Process has been well documented. One requirement is to report the improvements in teaching and learning outcomes made in programs on an annual basis. It is recommended that the teaching and learning outcomes reported on specifically include outcomes addressing Valencia’s Core Competencies: Think, Value, Act, and Communicate.